death squads

The Asian nation was rocked by detailed, vivid testimony of a self-confessed alleged death squad member.
"If you know of any addicts, go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful."
There's more to Rodrigo Duterte than just his controversial statements.
It is the denial of the very existence of the paramilitary death squads -- the worst human rights abusers in Colombia -- which gives the U.S. the pretext to certify Colombia's human rights record and to continue delivering lethal military assistance to that country.
While Colombia, the U.S.'s staunchest ally in the Hemisphere, is held out as some beacon of democracy in Latin America, the facts on the ground tell a very different story. Of course, you will rarely hear those facts, or about Colombia at all, given the general laziness and slavishness of our main stream media, so here they are.
What the U.S. has had "going on" in Colombia for decades is massive military involvement, both overt and covert, though one would hardly know from the lack of media attention on this issue.
In his contribution to the recent report put together by the Historical Commission of the Colombian Armed Conflict and Its Victims (Feb. 2015), one of Colombia's bravest voices, Father Javier Giraldo, S.J., gives his take on "The Origins of The Armed Conflict, its Persistence and its Impacts."
Due to the good journalism of Colombia Reports as well as FAIR, there has been some attention given to the scandal of U. S. military and military contractors sexually assaulting young women and girls in Colombia.
While the press continues to vilify Venezuela, to the exclusion of any Colombian coverage, Colombians are actually seeking safe haven in Venezuela -- an irony worth noting.
The murder of progressive clergy in Colombia continues to be part and parcel of the policy of both the Colombian military, and the U.S. which sponsors it, to prevent social change in Colombia and throughout Latin America.
A tragic milestone went virtually unreported in the English-speaking press last week, as Colombia's Victims Unit released its report indicating that the number of victims of Colombia's civil war has now surpassed 7 million.
Michael Peroutka's neo-Confederate friend and supporter Michael Hill has advocated a program of assassination against journalists and elected officials. Voters have a right to know what Peroutka and other GOP leaders have to say about that.
At a critical juncture for the Colombian peace process, 245 lawmakers from the U.S. Congress, the Irish and UK Parliaments, and the Northern Irish Assembly have sent a letter of support to the Colombian government and FARC peace negotiators.
While it is remarkable that such death squad violence continues to haunt our hemisphere into the 21st century, what is even remarkable is that the U.S. government, which helped create the death squads to begin with, takes no responsibility for this violence.
Where Oppenheimer's genius truly shines is in the postmodern concept behind the film. As he notes, when you film someone
The proposal to create a new elite police unit in Honduras called TIGRES is a really bad idea. The acronym stands for Intelligence Troop and Special Security Response Groups, or "Tigers." Clever acronym, but dumb concept.
Uhuru Kenyatta's disputed election to the presidency of Kenya earlier this month raises a host of questions regarding its legality, Kenyatta's indictment at the International Criminal Court (ICC), and whether Kenya will become isolated as a result.
It is the U.S. which, since 1962, has cultivated the very death squads which haunt the Church of the poor in Latin America, and specifically in Colombia.