Deep Blue

Some consider Deep Blue to be one of the biggest great white sharks ever filmed.
This Is How It Happened by Paula Stokes “A sobering exploration of absolution. (Fiction. 12-16)” A terrible accident shatters
Before IBM's Deep Blue made it cool, there was a chess-playing computer. In the late 18th century and into the 19th, it wowed incredulous audiences who couldn't tell, though many suspected, that a human was somehow behind it.
Our world increasingly depends on elaborate networks like electric power grids and globally dispersed manufacturing. Unless these networks are highly resilient, their benefits could be outweighed by catastrophic breakdowns.
In this historic moment, many are skeptical, if not outright afraid of what is next. Remarkable innovations like AlphaGo scare enough people that there is a legitimate debate about whether the risks of artificial intelligence could outweigh the rewards.
There is no stopping our shared future with intelligent machines, whether this brings us comfort or conflict or both. Those lessons from the Stone Age must surely remain in our bones, and we cannot shake them even as we look ahead to the stars or down at our phones.
Whatever Regina Taylor is trying to get across in stop. reset., at the Pershing Square Signature Center's Romulus Linney
Garry Kasparov The New York Review of Books This astronomical scale is not at all irrelevant to chess programmers. They've