detroit-business

I moved out of the state nearly four years ago, so when I visited recently, I came at Detroit with a fresh set of eyes. What I saw surprised me -- a city that's already on the rise.
As the month of September approaches its end, the start of construction for the Detroit Red Wings' sleek, state-of-the-art, and highly anticipated hockey arena approaches.
Erika Boyd and Kirsten Ussery-Boyd. Photo courtesy Detroit Vegan Soul. Back in the '80s, David Humphries was a club promoter
Every business, including my own, has its own self-sustainment as its primary goal; yet, we Detroiters tend to include in our personal goals a desire - a need - to help Detroit.
I believe Fernando Palazuelo, the new owner of the Packard Plant, is going to be successful beyond our expectations in his goal of redeveloping the Packard for several reasons you may not have thought of.
Mayor Duggan cannot rest his laurels on mere trash pick up and snow removal. He has got to attack poverty in Detroit head on.
A deal still has to be made to rescue the city and all stakeholders should have some say if the end result is to sustain a vibrant and viable city.
The Los Angeles Auto Show is a somewhat quiet affair for the Detroit Three. But the auto show that is in the city where General Motors, Ford and Chrysler all covet better sales, is not without news and a few meaningful curtain raisers.
The question for Marchionne, and those possibly teed up to buy the shares of the storied automaker is this: Is Chrysler a "buy"?
Is Detroit a basket case? Indeed, many of us who work and live in the Detroit metropolitan area are becoming thoroughly annoyed with the tears of the media. It seems as if many Americans are using us to deflect other unsolved problems by implying that "we are not as bad as Detroit."
The Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority has been close to giving Magic Plus LLC the state fairgrounds for The article
Duggan had to run as a write-in candidate after a technicality in his petition to run for mayor barred him from the ballot
Do you think the damage from the pending bankruptcy of the city of Detroit will be limited to Detroit? Think again. Detroit is partly the victim of economic trends far beyond its control, the downsizing and outsourcing of the auto industry and the collapse of the sub-prime bubble, to name just two. And yes, the city has suffered from corrupt and inept local government. But leaving Detroit to a bankruptcy process that favors investment bankers over local pensioners will neither provide a fair outcome nor contain the damage. It is a travesty that the federal government and the Michigan state government are not sending Detroit a lifeline. Other cities and states stand to lose both public services and pension benefits as this trend spreads. Chicago, which just suffered three levels of bond-downgrading, looks to be next.