diabetes-awareness

A spokesperson from Diabetes Research Connection has agreed to answer some questions regarding Type 1 diabetes and the research that is being conducted to understand this autoimmune disease more.
For 18 years of my life, I was embarrassed to admit I was a Type 1 diabetic. I was embarrassed to admit I was different from everyone I went to school with. I was embarrassed I had to eat or drink juice in front of peers when the time didn't permit.
AYUDA is different than other humanitarian diabetes organizations, and I am fascinated by its proposition. First, it brings diabetes education and human resource support, not medical supplies, to local diabetes communities in need.
I faced some tough opponents throughout my career in the boxing ring. It took the perfect combination of punches, resilience and an enduring commitment to become a champion. Today, the U.S. is facing a hard-hitting opponent of its own -- diabetes.
"I do think managing Type 1 diabetes is difficult, and I wouldn't wish it on anyone, but it gives me a sense of purpose and clarity about what I'm meant to be doing. When I was diagnosed it woke me up to what's important in life, like relationships and helping others. Looking back, I don't think I'd change anything."
"One of the biggest [misconceptions] out there is people feel like diabetes runs in [their] family, so it’s inevitable that
Today, on World Diabetes Day, there is good news: Type 2 diabetes is preventable, and we can stop it from affecting even more around the world. The answer is as clear as the potential toll is severe -- health education.
Like his famous reggae musician uncle Bob Marley, Charles Mattocks is championing social change -- in diabetes. His ammunition? A bus, a film, healthy, affordable food and unbounded passion.