digital natives

Many millennials are driven by extrinsic goals, like money, status, and fame. For example, young people are enthralled with celebrity culture, and many want a piece of fame -- and think they can get it.
Johan Jørgen Grav shows how Wembo connects to the UN Global Goals Wembo consists of two digital products: an online dashboard
t's not just about the worst of the worst--the face of evil. It's also about us, the "regular people" who help create the environments that allow those faces of evil to fester. We have the power to change those environments.
I recently dove deep into the future for a series called *Work: Reimagined, analyzing the trends shaping the future of work and determining five qualities that will be imperative for successful future leaders.
Fashion provides millions of jobs and boosts other industries from IT to tourism. New taskforces and job requirements continuously emerge in a professional world increasingly driven by social media. Tech giants like Amazon, Apple, Google and Yahoo are capitalizing on the digital zeitgeist by bringing to life street trends and runway looks people are musing about online. Whoever can get the right word out the fastest, gets to cash in on it. The price is real and the race is on.
I just unfriended someone on Facebook who, in looking to hire an intern, specified that applicants needed to be 'young' and 'good with websites.' The poster also said the job could lead to 'indefinate' employment.
"America stands on the brink of disaster. Don't be fooled by the mythology of the digital native." -- Howard Rheingold Well
What exactly is a "digital native" and more importantly, what should we non-"digital native" educators do to help students manage their online identities? That's a question Youth Radio--an Oakland-based, youth-driven media production company--set out to answer, by developing curriculum resources that prepare teachers to nurture conscious youth in the digital world.
As a parenting expert and author, I'm fortunate enough to work with some of the premiere universities and hospitals currently conducting research on this very subject. So shouldn't I be inoculated against this type of unwelcome infiltration in my own home? Um, hell no. No parent is.
There is nothing wrong with wanting our children to be academically accomplished and happy, but many understand that giving to others actually brings the most joy to those that do the giving.
The real villain, I believe, is not standards-based reform but the way it was high-jacked by test-driven accountability hawks.
I see technology as I would a developing person who is transitioning from adolescence into adulthood. Much like a person's early life, these first 20 years have been filled with rapid development, exuberance, awkwardness, impulsivity, excess, impatience, a lack of wisdom and perspective, and missteps.
Considerable research has shown that there is large variation in Internet skills among today's millennials often related to their socioeconomic status.
But here's where the findings get really interesting... Of course, technology in kids' lives is beneficial -- it can provide
Today, the divide is more about the fact that young people neither see nor hear their elders because, from a communications standpoint, the two generations are not in the same room.
We can remember our first Compaq portable computers in the 1980s but that doesn't mean we are less savvy with Twitter or Facebook than younger generations.
Another thing. Hoodies tend to be vitamin deficient -- not enough the healthy sunshine vitamin D gets past those hoods. As
Have the "edited reality" conversation. Anyone can edit themselves to appear smarter, funnier and nearly physically flawless. Teens are concrete and literal thinkers. When viewing status updates and birthday party photos, they may conclude "everyone" is having fun and they're "always" excluded.
There are enormous benefits to technology, obviously -- but also a whole new set of challenges, especially for those of us raising children in the digital world, or navigating a complex work environment in which our colleagues now know everything about our personal lives as well.
Because the technology allowing us to constantly update our daily behavior is so new, the long-term effects of having a continuous morphing online presence won't be known for years to come.