digital revolution

Our political system is out of touch with the reality of our world.
Indeed, of great concern is the effect of such a policy on society: with such a disincentive to work, does it create laziness
How do you see the transformation to a digital economy more generally? We see the IT sector as core if we would like transformation
Sissi Johnson & Andrea Panconesi, LuisaViaRoma CEO / Courtesy of LuisaViaRoma When it comes to followers, less has the potential
Business leaders must seize the opportunity to use technology to infuse purpose into their corporate cultures in a way that
"Sticks and stones will break my bones. But words will never harm me." Journalists, academicians and activists at a seminar in Egypt this month would beg to differ, notably since hate speech by and via various media can take a life of its own and lead to untold damage.
To predict the future, it helps to examine one key leading indicator of tech investment: patent activity.
At the core of the next generation of the Internet is the technology underlying the digital currency Bitcoin: the blockchain. At its most basic, the blockchain is a global spreadsheet, an incorruptible digital ledger of financial transactions that can be programmed to record virtually everything of value and importance to humankind.
In hindsight, the digital economy has brought us many wonders. But I'm sad to say that every single "dark side" danger I mentioned in 1995's The Digital Economy has in fact come to fruition. I outlined eight issues. Here are the first four. You decide.
New technologies as varied as 3D printing, drones, self-driving cars, and networked clothing are going to solve many of our most entrenched problems. From hunger and disease to drought and famine, the digital revolution has the potential to fundamentally change the world.
Do you agree or disagree that in the future we will think "inserting radio-frequency identification in our babies' bodies is as normal as vaccination"? This is just one of many provocative questions put to the participants in a spirited Davos session entitled "What Future Do You Want?"
In Fig. 2, a tiny smart phone at fingertip level in my walk-in music closet -- once occupied by thousands of CDs, vinyl, songbooks
You don't just see The Barbican's recently opened Digital Revolution exhibition in London, you live it, breathe it, even make it.
Thanks to Snowden, we now know the Internet has become a giant government spying apparatus dependent on the complicity of companies we use everyday. A Reuters poll from April showed that a majority of Americans believe that technology companies including Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Amazon are "encroaching too much upon their lives." It's a rather remarkable statistic given these companies were universally loved not that long ago, widely imagined to be allies of the people against the old oligarchs.
If anything, Donald Sterling's problems have cemented this warning for others. We know even private people have turned themselves into instant journalists in the world we live in, and you can't unring the bell of the digital revolution.
A two-hour documentary can be condensed into a 5 minutes spoiler, and now the dating process can be shrunk to the glowing rectangles of our cell phones and intermittent chats throughout the day.
Supported by their community and the power of decentralized network, the new leaders navigate a world where curiosity, vision and adaptation are more necessary than convictions and authority.
There is no doubt that technology has had a lasting impact on libraries. Once thought to be going the way of traditional bookstores, libraries have rebounded and are thriving in a technology fueled world.
We were from from all over the world but we had all grown up with a computer at home. We were not only familiar with and excited by technology but it ran in our blood.