Dirty Jobs

So long Dirty Jobs, Clean Jobs are changing the way we work!
Presented by Orsted
Police in Oregon said tipsters fingered Rowe as resembling the stickup man in a bank video.
We spent summers on the Jersey Shore when I was a kid, in Ocean City. About a block from our house was a little store, called Lazaleri's. It was a mom and pop shop. The Lazaleri's had a deli, and sold a few groceries and penny candy, back in the day.
Are people who do physically demanding, not-afraid-to-get-dirty jobs like farming, mining and sheep castration (yes, you read that right) the happiest people on earth? So says Mike Rowe, host of the Discovery Channel's "Dirty Jobs." See if he changes your mind about what it means to be happy at work.
In the ad, Walmart promises to spend $250 billion over the next 10 years to create new U.S. manufacturing jobs. Nevertheless
"We've declared war on work." With two minutes to go in Mike Rowe's solid TEDTalk on the merits of dirty jobs, the host who's done maybe more crappy jobs than anyone, he spills the beans on a huge problem.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgMy appearance at TED helped solidify an idea that had started to take shape a year earlier, and the response to that appearance helped convince me that my idea had merit.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgWhy, we might ask, do we so easily accept the assumption that we're hard-wired for a specific economic pursuit?
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgFor the better part of 20 years whatever I did, wherever I worked, however much money I made, I was a stranger in my own skin. I never considered doing anything different.
mike roweAre people who do physically demanding, not-afraid-to-get-dirty jobs like farming, mining and sheep castration (yes, you read that right) the happiest people on earth?
I went Behind the Brand with Mike and talked about his new projects and how he's trying to ignite the job market by shining a spotlight on entrepreneurs and opportunities to get dirty again.
I can't say that Dirty Jobs never jumped the shark (since I literally leaped over one in season two), but we stuck to the mission statement. We worked hard. And we had a hell of a good time. It was, as they say, a very good run. To everyone, thanks very much.
Somewhere between the early '80s and today, we seem to have forgotten work feels good! It's empowering to finish the day knowing you accomplished something no matter how menial. I am concerned we've become very uppity.
Mike Rowe's manhood has never really been in question. He's proven himself up to any task on "Dirty Jobs," and his gung-ho
Find out where Mike ends up next as "Dirty Jobs" continues every Tuesday at 9 p.m. EST on Discovery. TV Replay scours the
Mike Rowe finds more "Dirty Jobs" every Tuesday at 9 p.m. EST on Discovery. He certainly enjoyed the opportunity to drive
The interior of the water treatment plant was so filthy, in fact, that the cameras were quickly rendered virtually useless
Mike Rowe's trudged through all sorts of muck and grossness in his run as the host of "Dirty Jobs" (Tue., 9PM EST on DSC
But this week, he got to take on one of those dream jobs that a lot of kids think they want to be. He got to hang with the