dirty wars

Christian pastors and bloggers have the right to endorse or support any candidate and any president they wish. However, when Christian leaders compare the president or a presidential hopeful to Christ, they must backup their claims with facts.
When I learned that the widely acclaimed Argentinian film, The Secret in Their Eyes (2009), was going to get an American remake, I felt perplexed, but not solely due to the usual mistrust one has for a remake's ability to best, or even do justice to, the original film.
Mujica projected, from his presidential perch, the wildly innocent virtue of Uruguay itself -- and magnified it. If Uruguay as a country is part exile, part refuge, Mujica made the country more the latter. One thing is certain, the world will remember Mujica -- the president, the person.
If I'm choosing between two movies and both are entertaining and informative, but one is clearly out to change the world, I do find myself favoring the world-changer. That comes into play this year for me, though it may not for you.
No one can scientifically predict the future consequences of drone strikes, cruise missile attacks, and night raids. But from my experience in several undeclared war zones across the globe, it seems clear that the United States is helping to breed a new generation of enemies.
More than your story or Jeremy's story, Dirty Wars is the story of thousands of nameless and voiceless men, women and children.
I just saw Jeremy Scahill's documentary Dirty Wars, and it got me thinking about the phrase "American lives." You hear it from politicians all the time. And like any phrase that you repeat too many times, it starts to sound strange.
The White House is lucky that the carnival of crazy are beating the pots and pans on this issue, 'cause it means that you
Dirty Wars is a detective story that unfolds in countries we know in name only, places we hear about but will likely never visit, and from the people who populate these faraway lands from which we are so disconnected.
Kabul, Afghanistan: "This is a story about the seen and the unseen.... It's about things hidden in plain sight." Jeremy Scahill
With Dirty Wars it is as if Jeremy Scahill is holding up a mirror against the U.S. government's war against al Qaeda and its affiliates across the Middle East and Africa, while inviting us to look into the abyss of its practices.
What are some of those moves? The U.S. is continuing to use these things called signature strikes, where you don't necessarily
In 2010, Scahill was the first to reveal the plans of Blackwater founder Erik Prince to move his private security company
There was a secret history of twenty-first-century American war crying out to be written. Now, we have it in the form of Jeremy Scahill's latest book, Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield.
Few lawmakers have the guts to ask: What powers does our government have to kill people without due process? The larger question asked by Dirty Wars: What happens to us as Americans when we finally see what's hidden in plain sight?
Jeremy Scahill investigates the Joint Special Operations Command, the source of U.S. kill lists & drone strikes, in his film 'Dirty Wars' which premiered at Sundance.
Alicia talks to HuffPost Executive Arts and Entertainment Editor Mike Hogan plus some special guests about the latest from the Sundance Film Festival.
This year, the prestigious U.S. Documentary Competition offers left-leaning viewers a broad array of reasons to be outraged