disarmament

We must keep moving toward a world free of nuclear weapons. As President Obama said, it will take years to achieve this goal
Inside the dimly lit exhibit halls of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum amidst piles of rubble stand wax figures of burnt
When people are armed and outraged, the world so easily collapses into us vs. them. All complexity vanishes. People's life purpose clarifies into a simplistic certainty: Kill the enemy. Indeed, sacrifice your life to do so, if necessary.
Of all the accomplishments and disappointments of the Obama presidency, his nuclear weapons policy is the greatest. Yes, you
Jessica Reznicek arrested outside of Northrop Grumman Corporation in Nebraska Last winter, at the Voices home/office in Chicago
With no treaty in effect, nations could resume testing nukes at any time. This would cause a major arms race. The risk of nuclear terrorism or accidental launch make nuclear disarmament a very crucial goal for all nations. Japan wants to work with the United States on ending nuclear testing and building a world with no nukes.
As an interpreter for the U.S. Army and NATO during the last eight years in Afghanistan, I recognize that the Afghan government, despite receiving billions of dollars in U.S. assistance, is now a failed state.
The president said Trump's comments about nuclear weapons show he "doesn't know much" about proliferation.
Seven years ago in Prague, the President boldly put the pursuit of global zero at the top of his foreign policy agenda. It brought new energy to the decades-long struggle to end the nuclear threat, and held all the promise of being a defining moment for a historic presidency. Today, it is a promise unfulfilled.
After 220,000 dead (80 percent of whom were civilians), tens of thousands disappeared, countless victims of sexual violence, and more than 6 million internally displaced, it's time to stop the war.