disciplining kids

“My daughter Shawna is physically and verbally abusive to my 12-year-old granddaughter,” claims Vicki. “Shawna tells my granddaughter
The latest craze, fad, and craziness that has burst upon the pop culture scene is Pokémon Go, brought to us by, once again, Nintendo. I thought this company was dead! Well, at least in my mind it was. I had buried it years ago.
There have been times when I have desperately wanted to throw my hands in the air and scream, and times when I have done just that. But there have also been moments when I have felt like I was the student instead of the teacher.
Or Else is a terrible way to raise children. Having expectations that are so rigid that you have already mapped out the child's life before you meet the child -- that's no way to parent, and it's certainly no way to run a school system.
Last week NFL player Adrian Peterson turned himself in on charges of child abuse after a session of disciplining his 4-year-old son left cuts, welts and bruises on the boy's body. The gruesome incident sparked a national debate about whether or not it's ever OK for a parent to hit a child. Research shows the answer is a resounding "No!"
Relying on punishment and reward is a lot like relying on fast food; in the moment it can be instantly gratifying, but nothing is really achieved.
The thing is, I can say with great certainty that if Archie had been a typical child, she would not have even looked twice. In fact, she may have even thought, too bad, punk. But because Archie has Down syndrome, in her mind, he needed to be let off the hook. Um, no.
Kids really don't care at all about what happens in the future unless by "the future" you mean the next eight seconds.
I will love her AND be mad at her. I will know that this may not be the right thing to do, but it is the best way I know how to do it at that moment.
Despite the apparent sudden uptick in public shaming as a parenting tool, however, many experts caution humiliation can actually
If parents don't know how to discipline their own children, that is a parenting issue, not a teaching issue.
Children want to be like their parents: If you can regulate your own tension, the children will learn to do that too. If you put your feelings into words, once again, your children will learn to do that.
They say that those who fight the hardest are those who are the most alike, so perhaps it shouldn't have surprised me that when it comes to parenting, the English and the French have quite a bit in common.
I have survived two decades of parenting by talking to myself. My incantations are my alter ego reminding me to put things in perspective, step back and take a breath and that things will probably be okay. So while the mom voice in my head is shrieking, at myself or my kids, there is a calmer quieter voice reminding me to count to 10 before I speak.
Now I'm beginning to think my parents' judgment was a good deal better than I gave them credit for -- at least when it comes to getting your kids to do what needs to get done.
After all four of my boys burst into tears, I decided enough was enough.
The behavior I'm expecting from my daughter has not gotten better because what I'm doing is just being confrontational and even desperate in my attempt to "fix" a problem without digging deeper to find strategies that would be more long-term.
Kids have an inordinate amount of power and control in their families. Many parents seem unwilling to be the authority, take control and be firm with their kids. It's as if parents are afraid of "damaging" their kids or their relationship with them if they say, "no."
With the holidays upon us, what other grandmas might do may be tested. Families will gather and children will act up. Some grandparents will spank or send kids into corners. Some parents will bristle. Or not. To each his own.