divorce corp

In the following interview Dr. Drew Pinsky talks about why he decided to be part of Divorce Corp, why he believes people should still get married despite the divorce rate in America, how he would change the family court system so that it's fair, and his best advice for you.
Elizabeth Cobun joins Nancy to talk about why she still has to pay child support even though she's owed one hundred thousand dollars in alimony.
Mark Byron joins HuffPost Live to explain how a Facebook rant threatened his joint-custody.
Dan Brewington joins HuffPost Live to talk about his experience blogging about his divorce, and how it landed him in jail.
I finally saw Divorce Corp. Finally. After much banter on Facebook, a barrage of emails, a New York Times article, and the Huffington Post's own Paul Raeburn's review of the film, I finally saw what all the fuss is about.
Divorce Corp. does not provide a balanced perspective of divorce, it's incredibly one sided. Like many in the documentary, I experienced a long protracted divorce process which lasted over 7 years. However, unlike these litigants, I don't blame all of this on the lawyers.
The film reminds us that divorce is expensive and can lead to years-long fights over alimony, child support, and custody; that's not surprising. Many of us have been through that process or watched family members go through it. What is shocking in this film is the depiction of lawlessness in the family courts.
"I think death would be easier than divorce," begins the trailer for "Divorce Corps" -- a new documentary that aims to expose