divorce law

A woman is 35 years old. She is unmarried. She wants to have a child. She realizes that her childbearing years are coming
Getting a divorce requires a lot of adulting. (And yes, "adulting" is now a verb.) The timing on that couldn't be worse, because when you're getting a divorce, adulting is extremely challenging.
Every single thing we say and do are actions which we have chosen to make. What we don't say and do are the result of our inactions, which are also choices. Whether those choices are conscious or unconscious, they are still choices.
While there are many things you should ask your divorce lawyer, you should really also ask yourself many things such as simply "do I feel good about him or her."
Whether I realize it or not, because of the nature of their work, lawyers tend to be logical, analytical and rule-oriented people with very low emotional intelligence (EI) levels. It makes perfect sense when you consider that their job is to effectuate a "win."
When we buy a house, the deed is recorded with the County Recorder. There is a public record of who the owner of the property is. If someone is injured on the property, it is relatively easy to find out who the responsible party is.
Although evidence of a cheating spouse would have been more useful in a previous era of family law, it is far easier to get such evidence today with the rise of the internet and social media, and so such evidence continues appearing in divorce cases.
When couples marry for the first time -- increasingly in their thirties -- they aren't saying "'til death do us part" any more, but making up their own conditional standard of commitment, like, "as long as we love."
When people decide to divorce they often understand that they will have to divide up property. They often think that they are doing so in exchange for their personal freedom. But the fact is that their personal freedoms are significantly more infringed upon once they are divorced than they ever were while married.
Please understand, I am not selling divorce. You are not abandoning your marriage: That was your spouse's choice. You are not to blame for the death of your marriage. But if you delay, you could spend the rest of your life blaming yourself for the disaster of your divorce.