dna evidence

Coley McCraney, 45, faces murder and rape charges for the shooting deaths of Tracie Hawlett and J.B. Beasley.
Kenneth Moore has spent decades behind bars for crimes he claims he did not commit. The Alameda County district attorney's office is refusing him a chance to prove his innocence.
Geovanni Borjas faces rape, murder and kidnapping charges, police said.
"I feel blessed," John Nolley, 42, said after leaving a Texas courtroom Tuesday.
The Innocence Project at Cardozo Law School reports 337 post-conviction exonerations in the U.S. since 1989. But damage done
The petitioning of a court to grant a Writ of Habeas Corpus, frequently coupled with a request for an Evidentiary Hearing
Almost two years ago, Kenneth Thompson was running to become Brooklyn's District Attorney. Not only did Mr. Thompson promise to be hard on crime, he also promised to reexamine the cases of those who claimed to be innocent. Mr. Thompson eventually won, and, true to his word, his office has reviewed a large number of cases.
The record number of exonerations of innocent prisoners last year shows that something is very wrong with our judicial system. If the saying "the proof is in the numbers" is true, then why is this system moving at a snail's pace to combat the causes of wrongful convictions?
With such a powerful tool at their disposal, it was inevitable that the government's collection of DNA would become a slippery slope toward government intrusion.
The wrongful convictions data coming from the Innocence Project provide all the proof we need that all things are not equal in the application of American justice. Justice is color coded, and truly a matter of black and white. Now is the time to change that.