Do Over

Stephen Colbert offered Bill Clinton a “do over” for his “tone-deaf” remarks to NBC about Monica Lewinsky.
I often post photos of my kids on social media sites of times when they were much younger, for things like Way Back Wednesday, Throwback Thursday and even Flashback Friday. Quite often someone will say, don't you wish you could go back in time and re-live those days? My answer is a resounding no.
This past year, I experienced my first Do Over moment. I was suddenly laid off from a startup and left scrambling to rebuild my career. It worked out for the better when I found an exciting new job, but for a few months there, the future got scary.
My true Sept. 12 moment didn't happen for another thirteen. It took me five years to come out of my stupor; to quit the job in a place with no windows that I took after Sept 11.
My girl talks focus and determination all week, and damn, it makes me proud.
I will not and cannot parent my granddaughter because as far as I'm concerned she is already perfection. I am blind to her issues and happy to hand the parenting reigns to my son and daughter-in-law. Let them be in charge of the hard stuff. I want to be in charge of ice cream.
With Groundhog Day rapidly approaching, my mind has turned to the elusive do-over and the 1993 Bill Murray flick. When something in your life goes terribly wrong, it is possible to fix it.
The more I think about how to handle the Democratic delegates from Michigan and Florida, the more I am convinced that a revote, especially in Florida, is the wrong way to go.
The worst-case scenario for a Florida do-over is that the race is exceedingly close, and credible questions are raised about the fairness of the voting process.
For the first time, I am predicting two clean sweeps. John McCain will wipe the board for the Republicans, and Obama will