Doctor Patient Communication

Paula detested the sitter. And, by extension, she detested the medical team that ordered the sitter. "It's like you guys don't trust me to take care of myself!" she exclaimed, tears running down her face. The fact was, we didn't.
We aren't here to judge -- and we have seen and heard worse, I promise. Please, tell the truth. I can't take care of your child (or you) if you don't.
Although the CDC can be commended for its efforts to contain Ebola here and abroad, the effort could be improved if changes to the health and risk communication were made.
• Do exercise daily, and keep a diary of how well you are doing. Enlist the help of your family or friends (even your physician
You're distracted and perhaps a little surprised at the open expression of thanks. You say something like, "You're welcome
I make it a point to include a statement of uncertainty when offering my assessment and plan to patients in situations where a constellation of symptoms don't immediately add up by the end of an office visit. Am I right to do this? Well, I don't know.
After several weeks in the hospital, Gram was discharged to a sub-acute rehabilitation facility. Her recovery was slow to
HuffPost's Third Metric seeks to redefine success beyond money and power. As part of our ongoing series we take a look at doctor burnout and how doctors can use mindfulness to prevent it.
HuffPost's Third Metric seeks to redefine success beyond money and power. As part of our ongoing series we take a look at doctor burnout and how doctors can use mindfulness to prevent it.
"Burnout negatively affects quality of care with profound personal implications, including suicidal ideation," the study's
We must bring back the art of medicine and the art of healing and treat all of our patients with a "listening infusion."
Physicians need to lose the paternal attitude, embrace the new doctor/patient paradigm and gain some new partners who can help us prevent disease, manage big health global concerns (heart disease, cancer, hypertension) and shape a healthier world.
Being aware of what's happening in the room -- paying attention to the process -- requires an intention, a willingness to be present, to show up and engage with our patients in a way that is mutually respectful.
Have you tried to tell your story, only to have the doctor interrupt with a list of questions? This advice should help.
Lots of people are using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) these days -- things like vitamins, homeopathic or herbal medicine, chiropractors, acupuncture or massage therapy. But they don't always tell their doctors about it.
Many people are demanding better oversight of drug manufacturers in the wake of the recent fungal meningitis outbreak. But few people are asking an even more important question: Why were these patients getting questionable -- and mostly unnecessary -- steroid injections in the first place?
Patients like Robert make clear that the very personal meaning patients find in their illnesses can be profoundly empowering. All too often, however, health care does not allow patients to explore the personal significance of their diseases.
Has this ever happened to you? You are at an appointment with your doctor. She asks you for something, say, the dosage of your cholesterol medication or the results of your recent blood draw you had. You think to yourself, shoot, if only I brought that with me!
Seeds of knowledge and understanding for patients sometimes get integrated easily, and sometimes it seems impossible. I am reminded to never give up on a patient just starting out, some people take longer to make changes.
Helen's shortness of breath forced a trip to the emergency room. Over a seven-day course of treatment Helen was handed from one doctor to the next, accumulating a patchwork team of six doctors who worked sequentially rather than together.