dodd-frank act

For investigators of the massive oil and gas corruption that curses the world, the swamp just got more dangerous, because the sunlight was just snuffed out.
Given the rush, it is hardly a surprise that there was a fundamental misdiagnosis of the origins of the crisis. The simple
A new rule just announced by the Obama administration will, effective December 1, double the overtime-pay salary threshold and set it to automatically increase every three years. It's about time.
Last October, the U.S. Government criminally prosecuted and recovered more than $1 million from British defense contractor
The critics of the financial reform Dodd-Frank Act are fond of saying that it doesn't work -- some going so far as to say that the financial system is just as much at risk as it was in 2008, if not even more so.
The Bank Whistleblowers United's third weekly lemons award is made jointly to the Federal Housing Finance Agency and Fannie Mae (with a dishonorable mention to the federal judiciary). The award goes for these entities' indifference and even hostility to whistleblowers.
Yes the Affordable Care Act passed, as did Dodd-Frank, the stimulus bill, and a host of other important measures he described in his speech. But somewhere along the line the Obama realignment collapsed, dead by 2010. Why?
What I learned from last Sunday's Charlotte, South Carolina Democratic debate, the last debate before the Iowa and New Hampshire primaries, is that Bernie Sanders the idealist is almost a reincarnation of candidate Barack Obama in 2008 when Barack Obama was the fiery progressive on the campaign trail.
Why does Senator Bernie Sanders love Denmark, and has been mentioning it and the other Scandinavian countries as ideal models for a developed country, one he would like the U.S. to emulate?
As President Obama prepares to deliver his final State of the Union address on January 12, it's difficult to remember how incredibly bad the economy was when he took office seven years ago and how important financial reform is to getting the economy working again for all Americans.
Hillary and her #WallStreetDemocrats apparently believe that it is okay to continue to have financial institutions that are Too Big To Fail. Her plan is to always have enough complex rules and regulations in place to control their increasingly complex investment schemes.  
More than five years after the passage of Dodd-Frank the SEC finally issued rules on disclosure of CEO pay last week. This is useful information for trends in inequality. Corporate lobbyists have spent the last five years complaining that this disclosure would impose an enormous burden.
Lawmakers have failed to keep the wage apace with inflation so that its value is now less than it was five decades ago.
The facts of the crisis also make clear that the impacts did not know partisan boundaries. In fact, the economic wreckage from the 2008 financial crash hit every state in the country, regardless of whether the state voted for the Republican or Democratic candidate for President.
The SEC has a straightforward mission to protect investors: It must make sure that companies selling securities to investors tell the truth about their businesses, the securities they sell, and the risks involved.
Five years ago, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) was signed into law. Nevertheless, sections of the law still remain to be implemented because of delays in enacting regulations.
When five of the world's biggest banks were busted this week for manipulating the cost of dollars and euros, they did more than violate antitrust laws. They violated the public trust.
Five years and a week ago, the market suffered one of the most violent drops and bizarre recoveries. Just a few short weeks ago Navinder Singh Sarao was accused of having helped cause it.
With payments out in the open, citizens can hold their governments accountable for how they spend payments, and companies can be held accountable for paying what is due. Armed with that information, activists can push for more of that money to be spent back in their communities.
Social anthropologist Janine Wedel, author, most lately, of Unaccountable: How Elite Power Brokers Corrupt Our Finances, Freedom, and Security, has spent decades getting to the bottom of how powerful people wield influence. Truth and transparency, she warns, have devolved into a performance art.