doma immigration

Former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and law professor David Strange made a wholly unfounded argument July 18, 2013, in The New York Times. Their attempt to carve LGBT families out of federal immigration protections is baseless and punitive.
Immigration is very complicated, so I contacted Bryan K. Randolph, an attorney practicing in Maryland and the Washington, D.C., area who is preparing to face an influx of cases of binational same-sex couples seeking recognition of their relationships for the purpose of immigration.
One impact of the Court's decision that resounds far beyond our borders, is in the area of immigration.
The Supreme Court's landmark decision to strike down parts of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and essentially nullify
The DOMA decision aids binational LGBT couples; Senators formally added an amendment on Wednesday that increases border security measures in the "gang of eight" immigration bill.
"So much remains to be done in order for all of America’s immigrant families to be able to live with dignity, pursue their
Lesbian and gay binational couples remain shut out of green cards and fiancé(e) visas. As a result, LGBT families are still torn apart, forced into exile or left fighting to remain together in this country. None of them feel that we have already won, and to say that is an insult to their struggle.
There is support for such a concept from many Democrats, some of whom have signed on to bills such as the Uniting American
The case is part of a broader push for equal immigration rights for same-sex couples. Immigration Equality renewed its call
Whether or not they are legally married, Americans in same-sex relationships have no legal options to help their partners
While the White House has said it cannot approve green cards for lesbian and gay spouses because of DOMA, what it has failed to tell the LGBT community is that it can hold those applications -- rather than deny them -- as the courts and Congress decide DOMA's ultimate fate.