domestic violence awareness month

Make no mistake, incidents of domestic violence are occurring every day in every community, in every socio-economic group
My mother couldn't and didn't want to remain in a relationship that was abusive and oppressive. Her mother taught her to "obey your man", but that didn't mean she would have to subject herself to a life of physical abuse and mental torment.
This kind of portrayal relies on a negative shock factor that may undermine its effectiveness.
October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and we need to discuss some numbers.
It's for an incredible domestic violence awareness effort.
We were kissing in an Italian art museum. The Galleria Borghese, the sculpture room. He had one hand entwined in mine, the other around my neck. Other tourists were staring, but we were in Rome, and when in Rome, one kissed when one was in love.
Other factors such as race, sexual orientation, disability status, or any combination of oppressions which can often result in women and girls being potentially exposed to and experiencing a heightened risk of violence and barrier to safety during their lifetime.
As many of you may know, October is domestic violence awareness month. Every year, those of us who find passion in working
We need to cultivate awareness all year long of abuser attitudes in politics, in media and film, and, yes, in religion as well. And when we see it, we need to call it out. Mr. Trump, you do not have the right to control Ms. Machado's body or that of any other woman.
Even now, six years later, I struggle to get the words out. How do you tell people that you let somebody make you feel so insignificant, you let somebody treat you so appallingly that you didn't even know who you were anymore? Trust me guys this is hard.
A few months ago, I wrote about the need to bear witness to domestic violence in Nigeria. A couple of nights ago, I was a witness to domestic violence in a busy restaurant -- a sad reminder of importance of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.
You are not alone. The statistics on domestic violence tell a sad story. But what's even sadder, is that we know the statistics only reflect what is reported. There is so much more pain out there that will never make it onto a researcher's spreadsheet.
For too long, men have been conspicuously absent from prevention and intervention efforts. It is time to involve men and make them part of the solution. Men need to be part of the solution because men are the primary perpetrators of domestic violence and sexual assault.
The Declaration of Sentiments is the document signed in 1984 after the first women's rights convention, the Seneca Falls Convention. The document, which can be found here, is worded much like the Constitution, but instead of outlining the rights of "man" it outlines the rights of women.
The thing about race is that you can't hide it. You can code-switch, adjust your mannerisms, intonation, and vernacular, but when you appear ethnically ambiguous with a name that most cannot wrap their tongue around, blending in becomes a little more challenging.
Asking that domestic abusers be denied access to firearms is not an infringement upon your second amendment rights. Asking that states submit up-to-date records on individuals convicted of crimes such as stalking, domestic violence or sexual assault in order to ensure background checks are effective is not a violation of your right to privacy.
More than 12 million women and men in the United States experience domestic violence, sexual violence or stalking by intimate partners every year - that's an estimated 24 people per minute. And while the physical and emotional harm survivors suffer is severe and grievous, the damage does not stop there.
When I was a child, the idea of beating someone or hitting them out of love was a concept that weighed heavily in my home. I witnessed my father beat my mother with heartbreaking regularity, and I saw this behavior in other African-American families as well.