Don Cornelius

The musical, aimed at "celebrating the origins of dance culture and the Black cultural experience," is set to debut on Broadway in 2021.
In a week where racial hatred resulted in a tragedy in Charleston, I had a crazy thought: what would happen if we held a four hour Soul Train line in every city in this country?
In her new book, Love, Peace and Soul: Behind the Scenes of America's Favorite Dance Show, Soul Train, author Ericka Blount Danois does more than a pop-chronology or even a look behind the scenes.
His transcendent impact on Black culture and the world at large throughout the 1970s and 1980s was immeasurable. To call him simply a luminary does a great disservice to his contributions. He was a trendsetter, icon, and a barrier breaker.
Since Cornelius suffered an aneurysm in 1997, seizures plagued him in later years. In the final six months of his life, though
Perhaps the best way to honor the memory of an artist we will never forget is to choose to do that little bit more for someone in our lives who needs our help.
The death of Don Cornelius was major news. I wonder if Cornelius, himself, realized his place on the American scene. His impact was powerful with multiple dimensions. Without a doubt he took Black music mainstream.
In the wake of Don Cornelius' death, many suicide prevention advocates were hoping that his apparent suicide would give people an avenue for talking about something we don't like to discuss.
The recent death of TV pioneer Don Cornelius underscores the growing problem of depression and suicide among our elderly population. Most people don't expect older adults to take their own lives, but this population has the highest suicide rate of any age group.