Donald Sterling

In an era of excessive tape recording, no business mogul appears to be safe at home or at work. Just ask Donald Sterling
The University of Missouri football players who threatened to boycott upcoming games until their concerns about racism on campus were properly addressed are to be applauded.
The divorce filing comes amid a battle between the Sterlings that flared after the former owner was booted by the NBA over a leaked recording of him making racist remarks.
Here we are, in 2015, and Isiah Thomas is running a WNBA franchise. It seems fair to wonder, as a national issue, are we essentially saying racism is intolerable, but sexism, not so much?
As an African American, I have empathy for angry white men because I recognize that they are experiencing the pain African Americans have long borne -- of being bystanders to the shaping of their identities and possibilities in an uncertain world.
It was Stiviano who recorded a now-infamous conversation with Donald Sterling in which he berated her for associating with
While the prospect of patching up the road ahead may be bumpy, especially when you trudge through the potholes of 2014, some past wisdom may help us along the way.
This year, Urban Outfitters sold a "vintage" Kent State sweatshirt tastefully splattered with red paint while Donald Sterling's racial comments cost him his NBA franchise. It's been a raucous year in the public arena, expressed perfectly by a parade of PR blunders that is as impressive in scope as it is in sheer absurdity.
As years go, 2014 was an interesting one in the sports world. Some might characterize it as depressing while others may look back on it as exhilarating. Whatever the case may be we know that at some point in the future we will look back on the year 2014 with nostalgia.
In the final days of 2014, take a look back at the year's biggest news stories through the lens of HuffPost Live. From the
Comparing how quickly activists came together to form the Civil Rights and Anti-War movements in the '60s, to current sprouting social movements fueled by hashtags like #ICantBreathe, one can observe the exponential amplification value that social media serves in activism today.
Pascal's defense, which essentially amounts to a pivot away from the significance of what those emails symbolize, is simply not enough. It does not excuse the magnitude of the prejudice on display in those emails, prejudice coming from a person who sits in a position of power in Hollywood, no less.
2014 was full of Hollywood stars behaving oddly (See Shia LaBeouf and Amanda Bynes) and loads of fake viral videos. But this year saw fabrication with dead-serious ripple effects as well. Here are the prevaricators who rose to the top of the LieSpotting list this year:
--Comedian Dave Chappelle shares his thoughts on former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling losing ownership of the
"I don't see how the owners can say they're losing money now," Kevin Durrant, the league's MVP, told reporters. The former
Donald Sterling had me by the hand. You know that thing elderly women do where they grab the top of your hand with just their