donna tartt

The director behind “Brooklyn” will bring Tartt’s tome to the screen.
More Recommendations from Off the Shelf: By Lisa Unger | Off the Shelf This is the moment at which Theo's life begins to
The Leopard by Giuseppe Di Lampedusa One of my desert island books, The Leopard is not so much a novel as a eulogy for a
Unless they're four gorgeously written, painstakingly molded, amazingly rendered and undeniably memorable books. If you can pull off four of those a year, more power to you. But most can't. I'd go so far as to say no one can, the qualifier being good books.
If you're an editor like myself, you have a lot of manuscripts to read. If you're a bookseller, you've got to stay on top of what's being published. This summer it seems like most of the editors and booksellers I know are reading A Little Life, Hanya Yanagihara's second novel.
Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch has its admirers and detractors. But what can we say about the sensibility of an author who writes a novel based on a sui generis work by a l7th century painter, Carel Fabritius, at the same time naming its central character after the brother of a famous post-Impressionist painter?
What ensues is a tragic and powerful tale of love and hate, tragedy and rebirth. Zilelian's prose is lyrical at times, but for the most part she crafts a purposely flat realism that perfectly complements her subject matter.
The suspense builds inexorably as Simon struggles to find his child, while clinging to the belief his son is not a cold-blooded killer.
Even though Donna Tartt's novel drops off the list this week, Hachette makes a somewhat stronger showing than they have in some time, with two titles of its titles landing within the top ten.
The title that jumped six spots this week to unseat Gayle Forman's novel is Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child, and it, too, is published by Penguin Random House.