Don't tell mama

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According to owner Bernie Furshpan, the goal of this Flatiron district cabaret is to revive the "golden age of cabaret" with both renowned performers and new faces.
Ricky Ritzel is the Manhattan club world's kinetic musical fixture, the creative whirlwind who chaperones the weekly reunifications of Judy Garland and not-so-ever-lovin' daughter Liza -- or reasonable facsimiles thereof -- at Don't Tell Mama.
She doesn't shout at you. She's not big and brassy, not like some of our other acclaimed cabaret performers. And yet, Sheryl Spanier, in her simple red-sequined jacket, in her almost-offhand stage presence, commands the room as if she were whispering to each of us and we all stopped talking so we could hear the important things she wanted to tell us.
To Karen, size doesn't matter. She gives her all, regardless of whether she's performing in a vast symphony hall, in a Broadway theater or in this packed, 85-seat intimate club.
Shuford, whose Broadway credits include “The Little Mermaid” and “Beauty and the Beast,” says the idea for “Charming” came
If you lust after New York the way you think it was during the time when Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Alexander Wolcott made priceless remarks while getting drunk at the Algonquin Round Table don't miss Dirty Little Songs.
With a little Piaf, a mop of fiery red hair and a grin Miley Cyrus would envy, Ms. Lorkin offers up an honest portrayal of an artist balancing out the demands of survival in a difficult profession.
She was "The Last of the Red Hot Mammas" and the first to dare sing risque songs about the glories of independent women-hood: "I'm Living Alone and Like It" and "Ain't Women Wonderful."