Doris Kearns Goodwin

"I curse more than I should, and I find myself cursing more in this office than I had in my previous life.”
Ensconced in his aerie in Trump Tower high above Fifth Avenue, Donald Trump has been poring over a copy of Doris Kearns Goodwin's Team of Rivals, searching for ideas how he could emulate "the political genius of Abraham Lincoln."
Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian of the press, politics and presidents, explains a journalism fiasco.
No one should ever conflate non-violent protest -- no matter how creative or playful -- with a lack of grit or determination. Still, what can you do? The options are endless.
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Frum and Reagan debate the growing Ukrainian civil war and Obama's 2015 budget in a growing economy. What happens if sanctions and arms don't stop Russian-backed separatists? Can the GOP credibly complain about a wealth/income gap they created, but then oppose tax reform that reduces it?

These words were shockingly familiar to me as a college president who has seen my fair share of plagiarism cases. They are part of the litany of excuses that many students recite upon finding themselves accused of plagiarizing term papers.
Our not-so-secret wish is that the next president be an aggressive, committed political reformer. Whether emerging from the right or left, this man or woman should seek to pattern the creativity, drive, and entrepreneurial spirit of Teddy Roosevelt.
I work with today's young students, and I can affirm what you already know: The pervasive cynicism, hopelessness, and rage
In the maelstrom of the shutdown, a debt-ceiling suicide attempt and the cutting off of nutrition support for poor people by Congress, it's clear that America's political class has unbounded belief in national stability.
Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit was a seminal work in shaping thinking about consciousness and history. Steven Spielberg has created the cinematic equivalent of Hegel in Lincoln.
What kind of politician was Lincoln? How did he really outwit better-known candidates to win the Presidency in 1860 and assemble his "team of rivals"?
Multiplexes across the country hope this box-office boosting trend of politically engaged long-time female friends getting together to go berserk at a movie will continue.
Much has been made of the differences between these two presidential rivals, President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney. But are they so different after all?
At a moment when cultural trend-watchers are predicting the imminent demise of the traditional book in lieu of digitization, the American Antiquarian Society is honoring the strength of print as it celebrates its 200th anniversary.
Writer Walter Stahr gives William Henry Seward his due in this intelligent and illuminating biography of one of the most important political figures of the 19th century.
For more, click over to The Hollywood Reporter. In addition, John Hawkes, as well as Hal Holbrooke and James Spader, are
In honor of Presidents' Day, we compiled some of the most recent award-winning presidential biographies. Since most of you
The press surrounding George Bush's memoir reminded me of Karl Rove's claim from a few years ago that the two of them had a "book competition" for three years. Did Bush really have time to read?