doug aitken

Watch the full interview with Sarah Sze: http://channel.louisiana.dk/video/sarah-sze-meaning-between-things Watch the full
The Broad Museum, which opened in downtown last year, proudly celebrated its first year -- and proud it should be. Every
Artist Doug Aitken aims to call attention to the marine environment partly as a call for better conservation.
MOCA Gala 2016 at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Emanuele
Last weekend I had the opportunity to screen Doug Aitken's "Station to Station" at the Nuart in Santa Monica. Aiken attended the screening with fellow art world luminaries who were impressed by the film.
For all the years that I have lived in America, which has become my home since immigrating from Russia a few decades ago, I've had a dream: to get behind the wheel of a car and drive thousands upon thousands of adventurous miles across this beautiful country of ours.
Creating what his gallery term "fine art installations," and roaming across a wide range of media, techniques and subjects, Aitken's work has been difficult to categorize. But taken together, these three shows should give the unacquainted viewer a full overview of who he is.
"This interactive installation uses the audience’s body motions and positions to explore 3D reconstructions of urban and
I have a secret; how not only to avoid the stress connected with holiday shopping, but instead, to enjoy it. Yes, to enjoy Holiday shopping! Are you ready? Do you have a pen and paper handy?
The second exhibition that helped me to survive during the hot weekend was a groundbreaking - or more precisely, wallbreaking -- show at Regen Projects by the well-known Los Angeles artist Doug Aitken.
"Using a high-speed HD camera, painter/photographer/video artist James Nares slows down the densely busy streets of New York
It is a generative sculpture. The long strips of LED lights fixed to the side of the train are not pre-programmed, but are triggered by sensors on the train that measure light, temperature, sound and speed and are constantly remixing live.
The problem is not the things we like, it's the way we do business. It's the way huge corporations handle distributing goods, maximizing profits. We absolutely have the power to turn this around, to whatever extent that we really want to turn it around.
This is an "anything can happen" environment -- you make plans to do something in ten minutes and then another person will inject their ideas. Everything is constantly shifting. But I always think, collaboration and improvisation are so important.
What I discovered was that I was taking a different kind of picture than I'd taken before. I was emphasizing the foreground and leaving the background a little out of focus. It's an approach I'd never used before and found that I returned to a half dozen times that day.
Iconic American photographer Stephen Shore is showing us the images he shot the day before in tiny Winslow, Arizona. Empty intersections. A white station wagon buried in low shrubs.
I ducked into a black felt yurt set up in the Railyard in Santa Fe, New Mexico, one of the installations traveling with Doug Aitken's latest large-scale artwork, "Station To Station," and was instantly involved in a mind-bending discussion about the expansion of the universe.
The multi-disciplinary aesthetic experience kicked off last night with an epic New York happening, featuring performances
The “train” of Station to Station is a moving, kinetic, light sculpture, whose mission is to bring unforgettable art experiences