drone warfare

Another trick is what Bush and Obama have done with the aforementioned drone wars--trying to blatantly fold wars against
The U.S. has been fighting wars -- declared, half-declared, and undeclared -- for almost 15 years and, distant as they are, they've been coming home in all sorts of barely noted ways.
It's a case of the means justifying the end. The drones work so well that it must be all right to kill people with them.
The robot represents a significant escalation in the tools law enforcement use on the streets of America.
It seems counterintuitive, but these weapons could save innocent people.
The targeted assassination of Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansour last weekend wasn’t just another drone strike
"I’ve been waiting 40 years for someone like you." Those were the first words Daniel Ellsberg spoke to me when we met last
War-making is one area where there are few complaints about President Obama acting upon a very broad interpretation of executive authority that at times stretches the law and the Constitution beyond recognition.
With such films as Tsotsi and Rendition, director Gavin Hood has made a career out of tackling difficult subject matter and presenting them in a compelling fashion. His latest, the military thriller Eye in the Sky, which doubles as both a character drama and a meditation on the ramifications of drone warfare, is no exception.
Trump's pledge to murder the civilian relatives of terrorists could be considered quite modest -- and, in its bluntness, refreshingly candid -- when compared to President Obama's ongoing policy of loosing drones and U.S. Special Operations forces in the Greater Middle East.