drug crime

I encourage citizens to read the full report and, while doing so, keep three fundamental things in mind. • There is no allegation
Daniel Barrera Barrera engaged in a multi-million dollar scheme to manufacture and traffic hundreds of tons of cocaine.
"We will not stop until the last drug lord, the last financier and the last pusher have surrendered or put behind bars. Or below the ground if they so wish."
While the recent release of drug offenders is a promising start, those releases were for prisoners who were already close to leaving. In the coming two or three years, we'll see several thousand more such early releases related to that initiative, with a total of tens of thousands of federal prisoners effected by the sentencing reduction.
The state of our criminal justice system is simply so bad, the political climate for change so good, that it would be an epic desertion of our civic duties -- and of the pressure we as voters possess -- to let the 2016 election slip by without electoral promises of far-reaching reform. Which is why criminal justice must be a key issue for 2016 voters.
If substance use disorder, misuse of drugs and alcohol along with the rising overdose rate is viewed as a health crisis why are drug policies still seeking solutions within the criminal justice system?
Our smart, savvy urban youth know it's tough to get a job, and know they can make real money selling drugs -- and most of them have never been taught anything about legal entrepreneurship.
Although the outcome of a recent study was framed as, "Marijuana is the drug most often linked to crime in the United States," a closer look reveals the roots of old school reefer madness.
The category of drug arrests showed decreases in every type of crime; however, the vast majority of the drop resulted from
There is no simple, straightforward fix to America's drug problem. Successfully combating this social challenge requires an approach that blends drug treatment, smart law enforcement and alternatives to incarceration.
It has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt that Drug Courts work. Drug Courts significantly reduce drug abuse and crime and do so at less expense than any other justice strategy.