drug reform

I encourage citizens to read the full report and, while doing so, keep three fundamental things in mind. • There is no allegation
Policy based on common assumptions and popular sentiments can become a recipe for mistaken prescriptions and misguided interventions. Nowhere is this divorce between rhetoric and reality more evident than in the formulation of global drug policies.
The former secretary of state is once again coming under fire for using the word "super-predators."
The reasons that drugs like heroin, cocaine, marijuana and others are illegal today have far more to do with economics and cultural prejudice than with addiction.
In the War on Drugs no one really wins. Even drug traffickers with all their riches kill each other off. For these reasons and more, the possibility of global drug reform represented by April's special United Nation's session on the topic symbolizes hope for many people.
It's a rare day when the prohibitionist establishment and die-hard drug policy reformers are in agreement -- but that happens to be the case more often than not when it comes to what the U.S. insists on calling "synthetic drugs."
The drug war is the U.S.' most failed social policy intervention in modern history -- yet the call to rethink its assumptions, and revise our approach to regulation of illicit drugs, has been issued and seriously engaged only by reformers in Europe and Latin America.
Long story short, when thinking about prison reform, stakeholders need to consider the needs of the many, not the few. Reforms should be applicable to most prisoners, not solely first-time, non-violent drug offenders.
Two thousand of those eligible for early release are non-citizens, facing continued incarceration and deportation. This, in spite of a determination made by an independent federal agency that concludes they have served a complete fair sentence and now qualify to be free people.
A key Senate committee passed a bill today allowing the nation's capital to establish regulated marijuana stores and let banks provide financial services to state-legalized marijuana dispensaries.
Congress must thoroughly review the tactics that place agents and contractors in cozy contact with the cartels they are supposed to be dismantling. It must also take this opportunity to consider whether the DEA is fulfilling its mandate -- and to reassess that mandate.
Jamison Monroe and Christina Huffington talk about why it’s so important to have conversations regarding addiction and how these talks can even help people struggling with addiction to move towards recovery.
Regardless of their hardest attempts they and their families were constantly caught in this cycle -- a cycle that our country is complicit in creating, supporting and allowing to continue even when it is not functioning correctly.
I have been blown away to see how a committed group of leaders can have a global impact when it comes to the world's longest war: the war on drugs.
In seven weeks, voters across the country will have a chance to accelerate the unprecedented momentum to legalize marijuana and end the wider drug war. In fact, there are more drug policy reform questions on the ballot this November than ever in American history.
For the second year in a row, an international groundswell of activists have organized a Global Day of Action. In addition to the thousands of actions around the world focusing on various aspects of the failed drug war, drug policy reform advocates will be taking their protest right to the source: the UN Headquarters in New York.
To encourage the FDA to fast-track over-the-counter naloxone, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) should prioritize
April Jackson and Jason Jackson Cole join HuffPost Live to discuss how their father was sentenced to life in prison for trying to save his son's life.