druze

We should not allow the Christmas story to be stripped of its humanity or cleansed of its muck and grime. Its power is in its reality that should serve to focus our attention on our responsibility to see in the birth of Jesus: the faces of the outcasts for whom there is no room in the inn; the wretched of the earth for whom there is no comfort; and the frightened exiles who seek only safety and refuge. It is only when we do not avert our glance from these reminders that we can understand the story and spirit of Christmas.
The bigger threat to Lebanese stability is the implosion of Syria, which long played a dominant, sometimes controlling, role in Lebanon. Hezbollah has directly intervened on the side of the Assad regime. The Shia movement's involvement risks bringing the conflict back to Lebanon, as did Hezbollah's costly 2006 war with Israel.
The fact that the Druzes, as a distinct group of Israeli Arabs, have, despite job discrimination, flourished in Israel, offers hope for the future of Arab-Jewish cooperation and working together in the strife torn Middle East.
Sweida has until now largely stayed out of the war.
From Cup Final to The Human Resources Manager, from Lemon Tree to Zaytoun, Riklis has always talked about the untalkable in his films: Peace, humanity, and the ability to discuss what makes us different, while also celebrating our contrasts.
As rebel forces advance towards the mountainous Druze stronghold in Idlib province, Israel has to decide whether it should intervene in the Syrian civil war by arming the Druze while Saudi Arabia is faced with the choice between realpolitik and its religious doctrine which views the Druze as heretics.
In an interview with Al Jazeera news channel last month, the leader of the Nusra Front urged members of the Alawite sect
The State of Israel cannot and should not stay indifferent when Druze people are facing an existential threat on the other side of the border.
Lebanese caricaturists felt solidarity with French colleagues targeted in a terrorist attack on the satirical publication Charlie Hebdo this week, but admitted they're hamstrung by threats against them, terrorism, sectarianism, and political instability in their country.
“Every day it calms down here more, but our great fear is that one person dies and it could all start up again,” he said