Duke Ellington

The critic and free-speech crusader died at home, "surrounded by family listening to Billie Holiday," according to his son.
Here are my top twenty-five greatest jazz baritone saxophone solos in roughly chronological order: Mats Gustafsson from Catapult
This past weekend's program featured the appropriately titled: "The Jazz Age: Untamed Elegance," a sampling of some of the
Arturo O'Farrill Leads His Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra With Sizzling Rhythms and Subversive Politics Blue Note label execs
First Lady of Outer Space (and much more) Nichelle Nichols has beamed down to San Diego Comic Con this week, surprising us all with her smashing new single, "Fly Me to the Moon." The grand dame of sci-fi, who originated the role of Lieutenant Uhura on the original series of Star Trek 50 years ago, arrived Wednesday night to grace the world première extravaganza of Star Trek Beyond.
  That is not to say that all pop music is devoid of sophisticated harmonic, melodic, or rhythmic content--there is a surprising
The recording is a rare musical confluence. It is brightened by Jeffrey Biegel's performance history of the Gershwin and Ellington and fueled by his up-close-and-personal interactions with Keith Emerson and Neil Sedaka.
At this point in the show, members of the Jazz Journalist Association, Scott Fugate, aka the Jazz Evangelist, and myself
>The weekly column, On the "A" w/Souleo, covers the intersection of the arts, culture entertainment and philanthropy in Harlem and beyond and is written by Souleo, founder and president of event/media content production company Souleo Enterprises LLC.
The pianist has consistently tried to reach his own personal musical zenith, whether it be as a leader or as a much sought after sideman. With his latest recording Zenith he may have accomplished just that.
I couldn't believe I was going to a music festival honoring the famous Billy Strayhorn at the Auditorium Theater of Roosevelt University in Chicago -- "Lush Life: The Music of Billy Strayhorn." It felt as if I was attending a homecoming of sorts.
When I recently featured three current works from big bands, I was called to task for not having included at least one Latin big band. Well certainly that was not by design as there are many Afro-Cuban and Latin based bands that deserve mention so here is one that clearly deserves to be included in the mix.
A few years ago, Ben, our son with severe autism, got a chance to meet one of his favorite musicians -- or more accurately, meet the man responsible for creating some of his favorite music. We now know there's a big difference, and this "meeting" helped us understand our big guy a little better.
Beyond "Over the Rainbow," however, The Wizard of Oz proved that Harold Arlen was capable of writing a sophisticated, integrated musical score, creating songs that advanced the plot of a superior story, rather than songs that merely ornamented pedestrian scripts.
Jazz is making a comeback in New York City. Hipsters tip-tap their toes at joints like the Fat Cat and Iridium, taking in their grandparents' tunes. Nostalgia trends these days, and there's nothing like a wailing saxophone to put you in the mood.
From my earliest recollections, adults, when first meeting me, would invariably ask the question, "Do you know who your father is?" The query came from musicians and fans alike. I didn't really understand the question at first, because the answer seemed so obvious.
Darkness The Color of Snow begins one icy cold night, when rookie police officer Ronald Forbert pulls over an old high school chum for speeding. The car is filled with drunken friends, and when Forbert attempts to arrest the driver for DUI, a freakish accident leads to the driver's death.
She has been unquestionably the most dominant player in her era, arguably of any era, but she has been largely without a rival.