Duran Duran

The essential ingredients in John Carney's films: music and heart -- see Once (2007) and Begin Again (2013)-- bubble up in
I met Nile Rodgers winter of 1991. I was newly divorced and freshly hooked up with a hot-ass boyfriend with a ponytail and a bass guitar.
Thirty years ago, no one might have predicted that Nile Rodgers would be on the road with Duran Duran in 2016. Yet, this spring the producer and guitarist is playing to capacity crowds in support of the band's latest album.
Should we love something just because it's hummable and memorable (i.e. anything by The Weekend)? Or should we expect more out of a song (like when Adele shows us greatness)? Is there room for both approaches?
Imagine telling my teenage self that if I was very patient, when I'm in my late 30s, I would meet the idols of my youth. Duran Duran: Twenty-four years later, 85 million-plus records later. Me: Three sons later, a long career in journalism later. It finally happened.
On the occasion of Tri Angle Records 5th Anniversary as part of Red Bull Music Academy Festival New York, I got the chance to interview the charming Tri Angle Records founder Robin Carolan at my local neighborhood diner.
Fifty years ago, Shirley Bassey's Goldfinger, arguably the greatest James Bond theme of all, and one of the most explosive musical compositions in the history of cinema missed winning the Academy Award for Best Song -- in fact, it missed a nomination altogether.
Imagine a time where you couldn't check Facebook every 19 seconds or Instagram your lobster mac and cheese before you even took a bite. Dark times.
Keb' Mo': "The biggest difference on this one was our first recording of it. It was completely upside down, which I think is actually right side up. I started with the vocals. I recorded the vocals first, with nothing on it."
Today, many of these tracks have fallen into obscurity, but they deserve another listen, as they still sound incredible. In alphabetical order, here are my picks for the 90's best singles that missed the Top 50 (with accompanying video links).
The relationship between Duran Duran and one of its major fan clubs has officially come undone: The pop group that crooned
Hours before the doorbell rang, one of my Spotify "Hits of the '80s" playlists purred through our home speakers until my daughter yelled from the bathroom, "Dad, what ARE you listening to?" Jeez, what's wrong with a little Duran Duran to set the mood? Apparently everything.
Many tomes about Rock and Roll exist, but Mad World is one of the first to give artists from the 1980s another day in the sun: the interviews in the book are priceless.
The new-wave acts of the early '80s represent everything that mainstream pop acts aren't so free to be today. Imagine One Direction hitting the stage dressed like Kajagoogoo. Would teenage girls still go wild? Would Taylor Swift have dated one of them?
We found our new favorite Twitter account. Okay, our favorite after Chrissy Teigen's. History in Pictures is an account we
Ever since I was old enough to have self-deprecating thoughts, I've been aware of one fundamental truth: British people are better than me. They've got cooler accents, more interesting hair, come naturally dressed in layers, and they're both funnier and more miserable than anyone has a right to be.
Who killed rock-n-roll? The question will keep forensic scientists busy until Axl Rose is cloned and does it right this time.
Capped off by a hit-laden set from Chime for Change co-founder and Artistic Director, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter (which saw her joined onstage for "Crazy in Love" by her husband, Jay-Z), the list of performers and presenters just might blow your mind a little.
I noticed him leaning up against the door jamb as I entered the kitchen. He was tall, wore a white t-shirt and Levis and had his left ear pierced. He told me it was his 29th birthday. After a guessing game of how old I was, I revealed that I was 13.