D.W. Griffith

Fifty years ago, a movie like "Get Out" couldn't have existed. But does this really mean progress?
It's somewhat disconcerting that Nate Parker chose to name his film after D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation (1915), since
This semester, I taught a repugnant movie. On purpose.
Doesn't an African American artist deserve the same chance for rehabilitation that was extended to a white one? I have no easy solution, just questions and an old memory of vulnerability.
We must be bold enough to tell our own histories, even as we strive to listen more faithfully. The president reminds us, "America is not some fragile thing."
The first major box office hit charged a staggering $2 admission and reached 50 million people before sound films appeared in 1927. Its millions in profits built Hollywood. Beyond profits, it aimed to educate the public in the values of white supremacy.
The most virulent haters of President Obama have long been called "Birthers." A major historical anniversary we observe this month suggests that the name is far more appropriate than has been realized.
When he found the story of a little-known but highly successful black filmmaker from the 1920s, music producer Bayer Mack knew he had to correct history. Oscar Micheaux: The Czar of Black Hollywood is the result of Mack's work. The film tells an important story and places race relations and black history.
Though rare, the incident is far from the only case of large appliances being used to attack film directors.
Her fervor started before Wally died. When Wally's use became too obvious to ignore, she went to the already pouncing press