Dylan Matthews

About half of the benefits would go to the wealthiest 5 percent of Americans.
It seemed a wild, impossible dream a year ago when I told my wife and young daughters I was going to drive a bus shaped like a coffin across America to raise life extension issues.
I would be dissatisfied with a society in which middle-class and lower-middle-class earners have no chance to better themselves. In my opinion, the opportunity for self-improvement is a fundamental human right. What's more, it's not just those individuals who lose out. When social mobility denied to any group, society loses a vast talent pool filled with people who could make things better for everyone.
Federal workers will be expected to subsidize this deal with an increase in their out-of-pocket pension costs. There will be cuts to Medicare. Airline passengers will pay a new tax. Military retirees -- military retirees -- will see their benefits cut.
Economists are well aware that slowing labor force growth is a factor in slower growth predictions in the future, but faster immigrant flows can improve that outlook. But what about the near term impact of immigrant competition in a job market that's already too weak?
Mitch McConnell, the minority leader of the U.S. Senate, has for six years wielded the filibuster as a weapon in his rebellion against a founding principle of the United States of America -- self-governance by majority rule. The majority must seize back control.