E-books

In my last column, I talked about dipping my toe into the frothy waters of self-publishing after years of relying on traditional
... Typically, my first query for someone struggling with this dilemma is--what is your purpose for publishing a book? If
Paper makes reading physically pleasurable. Reading an e-book, on the other hand, feels like using an ATM. And after staring at a computer screen at work all day, how relaxing is it to curl up at home and stare at another screen?
Reading used to be something we did in solitude, but thanks to the Internet, things have changed dramatically. Now, reading has become something people from all around the world can partake in together, meeting on social media sites to talk about their favorite books.
At the National Book Review, we are platform agnostic, though we have a soft spot for print (our logo is a manual typewriter). But in this week when they are suddenly out of favor, Noah Benjamin-Pollak offers, in rant form, 10 reasons to love e-books:
For reasons I've never been entirely clear on, when the newspaper industry began its slow decline, the very best version of the professional journalist was compared to the very worst version of the Internet blogger, and somehow--perhaps we recently watched All the President's Men--we all went along with it.
Amazon is aware of these intersecting cultural trends, and the company doesn't want to be left behind. It was not my intention
Ah, yes: "platform." If you're an Indie author you know this term well. It might even be a four-letter word to you. This concept crept into the industry a few decades ago and has now become a major player.
President Barack Obama was interrupted by a sixth-grader who thought his answer about writer’s block was a bit long-winded
I'm comfortable admitting I'm addicted to reading. I would spend my last dollar on a book, and I have no shame admitting that. I love all that I've learned through books, and the comfort it gives me.