early puberty

When you're an adolescent, coming into your teen years sounds awesome. We wake up every morning pick out outfits based on how we feel that day, or consider the thought of grabbing the attention of a cute boy at school. Life is so easy for us then.
We have to let our girls have their girlhood and not be pushed into premature womanhood. It's not healthy for them as children and continues to affect them as adults.
Chemicals in your household products may be negatively affecting your hormones, says a recent study by the World Health Organization. The exposure happens on a daily basis from being in contact with items like soap, shampoo, cleaners, drinking water, food and plastic containers.
Early puberty certainly comes with medical implications but we also need to think about the psychological implications, which I believe we need to address in our homes and our schools.
Many girls in the U.S. may be entering puberty at younger ages now than in previous decades, and obesity appears to be the major factor contributing to this shift, a new study finds.
Earlier development of breasts may not necessarily mean a shift in the age of the first menstrual period, the researchers
I wanted to make sure members of Congress understand that their lack of action to effectively regulate industrial chemicals is worsening a growing public health crisis. It is heartening that Congress is finally paying attention. But who will they listen to?
While the dairy industry thinks we should embrace chemical sweeteners in our kids' milk to win the war against childhood obesity, in my upcoming book, The Omni Diet, I examine the case against drinking milk at all.
If you could ask any question of a wise and experienced neuroscientist and pediatrician, one who specializes in the secret emotional life and bizarre brain activity of your adolescent child, what would you ask?
This post is part of a series I will be writing on chemicals in our everyday products that may act as endocrine disruptors. These include the antibacterial chemical tricolsan, found in many personal care products.