eating bugs

A New York chef makes everything from cricket roast to "bug nog."
Eating insects is a hot topic and has been receiving lots of media attention lately which helps spread awareness. But more research needs to be done to develop the insect-rearing processes.
"Entomophagy is an evolving term in need of review," says Afton Marina Szasz Halloran, Ph.D Fellow at the University of Copenhagen. Halloran calls for a change in the way we speak about edible insects and entomophagy.
That is, at least, according to a couple of New York filmmakers.
“Just know the demand is there now,” Bachhuber said. “We’re starting to see shifts in peoples’ minds after we started telling
Martin stayed true to her word when she shared two of her newest concoctions on set -- plates of candied sesame cricket stir
Wait, just hear us out. Insects could be the next big thing in food.
The Week in Weird closes out the week with a very special happy hour, that includes candied crickets and toasted waxworms. Entomophagist, Daniella Martin, joins us to share her best recipes and discuss how eating insects could save the world.
The Week in Weird closes out the week with a very special happy hour, that includes candied crickets and toasted waxworms. Entomophagist, Daniella Martin, joins us to share her best recipes and discuss how eating insects could save the world.
Bugs may be the protein of the future, so you might as well learn to love 'em.
All photos by Jean-Christophe Verhaegen. Check out Musquar's creations: Musquar's creations, which sell for €22 (about $30
Safety first However, one true tale of a Pleistocene repast comes from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Paleontologist
WATCH: Chocolate, for example, is allowed up to 60 insect fragments per 100 grams. And according to the video, five whole
That is, if sustainable eating is important to you.
I'd seen bizarre offerings at restaurants across China, but this was the weirdest. Not just AIDS soup, but AIDS Soup with Sheep Placenta.
No one really HAS to try these, but they darn near jumped off the shelf at my favorite Asian market a couple weeks ago, so I figured I had a duty to try them... so you don't have to.
Your food has to reach "Food Defect Action Levels" that have been created by the FDA before the regulator will take action