eating bugs

A New York chef makes everything from cricket roast to "bug nog."
Eating insects is a hot topic and has been receiving lots of media attention lately which helps spread awareness. But more research needs to be done to develop the insect-rearing processes.
"Entomophagy is an evolving term in need of review," says Afton Marina Szasz Halloran, Ph.D Fellow at the University of Copenhagen. Halloran calls for a change in the way we speak about edible insects and entomophagy.
That is, at least, according to a couple of New York filmmakers.
“It doesn’t exist,” Lesnik noted. “What exists is people eating insects as a primary or major source of protein over an entire
She continued, "the main reason I think that is that insects have been found to require far fewer environmental resources
Wait, just hear us out. Insects could be the next big thing in food.
The Week in Weird closes out the week with a very special happy hour, that includes candied crickets and toasted waxworms. Entomophagist, Daniella Martin, joins us to share her best recipes and discuss how eating insects could save the world.
The Week in Weird closes out the week with a very special happy hour, that includes candied crickets and toasted waxworms. Entomophagist, Daniella Martin, joins us to share her best recipes and discuss how eating insects could save the world.
Bugs may be the protein of the future, so you might as well learn to love 'em.