Economic Mobility

More than two-thirds said it's no longer commonplace for hard work to be a path from poverty to wealth, according to a new World Economic Forum poll.
Just three days after the summit the U.S. Census Bureau shared its latest report on income and poverty. The report showed
As doctors and child advocates who care for children, we want them to have the opportunity to grow up to be healthy, productive members of our society. To help them realize their potential, healthy economics may be one of the best remedies of all.
The door of opportunity to a middle class job at the Port of New York and New Jersey, America's third busiest port, is largely closed to Newark residents.
Clearly economic insecurity is everyone's issue: policy makers, business leaders, and educators, not to mention the millions of Americans who wrestle with it every day.
There are still two Americas, divided by race.
It's almost as if students require a lottery-esque winning ticket to have a better shot at succeeding in college. What would
I recently had the opportunity to hear jazz bassist Victor Wooten play at a club in my hometown, Oakland, California. His
If we want the world to be a better, more inclusive place, we need to get to know each other better. What we will discover is that those at the bottom of our economic ladder are amazingly resourceful and contribute tremendously to society.
Programs cannot replicate the innovation, ingenuity and cultural appropriateness of what families do for themselves. Further, programs cannot provide the ongoing emotional support that peers provide.
Growing up in poor neighborhoods and then running social service programs for 20 years, I heard countless stories about millions of people living in poverty. The percent of those in poverty never seems to change much, hovering around 15 percent, or more, of our population.
Calling for shame and charity in order to get our country to pay attention to poverty or the lack of mobility is old, and wrong. For 50 years, the stories from the war on poverty have almost singularly tried to shame us into addressing these issues, but, ultimately, they harm the cause.
For all the frantic, often chaotic political engagement swirling about us these days involving taxes, gun rights, religious liberty and foreign policy, Americans may well be overlooking an even bigger problem: Have we unconsciously consigned the American Dream to the proverbial dustbin?
America has a crisis right now around opportunity for young people. The American Dream -- that belief that through hard work and perseverance you can build a better life -- is in peril for a generation.
Just as "angel investors" look for talented graduates from Stanford, and parents with wealth look to invest in the talents of their kids, those of us wanting to be helpful can also seek out families and groups of families that are helping themselves and one another.
Our mainstream financial institutions are positioned to play a critical role in providing financial inclusion to young Americans and, by extension, expanding their wealth and the wealth of future generations. The question remains: will they collectively rise to the occasion?
With this community of friends surrounding them it was clear they would not lose the house. From that point on, I promised myself that I would try to avoid underestimating people's ability to solve their own problems.
In a three-part series I posted a few weeks ago, I shared the story of Myong, a refugee mother whom I tried to help when I ran a social service agency in the '80s.
This is the last in a series of three posts sharing the story of Myong, a refugee from Vietnam who was receiving counseling from Asian Neighborhood Design, the social service agency I ran in 1983.