ect

Why is this brain- and life-damaging treatment still being done? Money.
The anesthesiologist said, "Okay, Dyane. I want you to count backwards from 10." When I reached "5," boom! I was fast asleep. I didn't feel a thing. There was no pain during or after the ECT.
For me, the benefits of ECT have greatly outweighed my initial fears. I never imagined the positive results I would have in response to this treatment.
A new study shows ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) causes brain damage? That's not what you will find in the many promotional press releases published in the mainstream media.
When I was a freshman in college leading the Harvard Mental Hospital Volunteer Program I found myself with free access to the state mental hospital in which we volunteered, and I got to see shock treatment. Electroshock patients were brought into the shock room led by burly aids and strapped down on the shock table.
Dr. Richard P. Bentall, professor and practitioner of clinical psychology in Britain, exposes the highly dubious nature of reigning presumptions about the causes and treatment of mental illness.
As far-fetched as it sounds, the FDA is considering making it more difficult to treat depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and psychosis.
It is not unusual for psychiatrists to simply prescribe one drug, then another drug, then several drug combinations (called "cocktails"), and if those fail, recommend ECT.
Shock treatment must be banned. We can begin by banning it on children eighteen and younger, and involuntary adults.