edison electric institute

Like Big Oil, power companies have long seen the danger of fossil fuels, a new report finds.
From across the nation an army of men, and a few women, is on the move. They are deployed with tools and gauges, maps and their own know-how in a critical battle. They are shock troops fighting the flooding in North and South Carolina.
Governments have double standards, exempting themselves when it suits from the norms they are trying to institutionalize. Cyber mischief and defending against it are both big businesses, and the existential threat is always there.
The railroads got away from the electric utilities, and they won't be corralled now. But there is a powerful environmental
The industry's new crisis communications expert advocates "reputation management."
Through university courses, conferences, and reports facilitated by academic staff, the utility industry and its trade association, the Edison Electric Institute, have boosted lobbying efforts targeting state government officials and decision makers.
Exelon's ultimate goal: Force Pepco's customers, including the people of Washington, D.C., to subsidize Exelon's expensive nuclear power plants in other states. D.C. residents have until May 26 to submit comments to the Public Service Commission.
Exelon has a long history of using political influence to oppose the deployment of renewable energy. Exelon’s political operations
These pro-clean energy policies translate into direct market competition for ALEC's corporate membership in the fossil fuel, coal, and utility industries.
Utilities make their money by building big, new infrastructure projects and then sending ratepayers the bill. This is exactly why utilities want to eliminate policies that encourage homeowners and businesses to go solar.