education data

The government's annual "Condition of Education" report shows disparities continue through high school and college.
The infrastructure and use of data to support students has grown tremendously over the last decade. We now have tools that alert educators when students are at risk of falling off track. We have programs that identify opportunities for students, like scholarships, they may not be aware of otherwise.
Teachers reported that kindergarten students from affluent households in the 2010-2011 school year were more likely to have
Where student data are concerned, privacy and security are paramount. Information is power, and we need to keep private, personal information out of the wrong hands. But what about getting the right information into the right hands?
Every teacher and school leader needs the training, the tools, the time, and the trust to be able to use data to help students--and to help their parents better support their students learning. I have been fortunate to be part of a school that values and uses information. Doesn't every parent deserve that opportunity? I think so.
This week's White House "College Opportunity" summit will focus on an overlooked area with enormous potential for student success: K-12 and higher education working together to improve college completion. It sounds so simple and obvious. In fact many assume it's already happening.
Creating policies and practices that give educators and families useful information about students to improve their learning is a monumental task. This work takes dedicated resources, dedicated time, and dedicated professionals -- lots of them.
While report card day is a moment of truth for students, when is the time for states to pony up accurate information about how they're doing to parents? The answer in too many states is not often enough.
Like all powerful tools, data can be used effectively and they can be misused. That's why we need the right policies and practices in place to ensure they're being used to encourage learning and increase achievement.
It's hard to overstate this accomplishment. These were governors of opposing parties coming together in agreement over a