edward albee

An Oregon theater producer claims that Edward Albee's estate refused to grant him the rights to present "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" with a black actor.
With continuously flowing liquor dissipating what few inhibitions Martha and George possess, the gathering peels away secrets
Edward Albee, arguably our greatest living playwright, is sitting in his Tribeca loft home, pondering the lingering effects
This weekend, just after Edward Albee's death at 88, the Montauk Library displayed books of his prodigious work in theater
The acclaimed playwright was known for "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and "A Delicate Balance."
Sarah Jessica Parker is a terrific actress. That's what artist Eric Fishl, in his role as Guild Hall's President of the Arts and gala host, said on Tuesday night at the Rainbow Room where the Sex & the City star was being feted for a Lifetime Achievement Award in the Performing Arts.
And theater, too. Most memorable for me was seeing him in Edward Albee's Sylvia, or The Goat, in which he has to tell his wife that he is in love with another, eh, female, that is, eh, another species -- eh, a goat.
Actors Silverman and Dellapina, who plays guitar and sings nicely along the way, perform well together, and Westrate has some effective stretches. If on arrival he were to play Nate as less immediately psychotic, Ziegler's script might have a more insinuating dramatic arc.
The subject of Lisa Grunwald and Stephen Adler's book is marriage, which may be why it fills 560 pages and weighs 3.7 pounds. "You won't able to put down," someone said. That was one buffed reader. Me, I could barely pick it up.
To wit, someone asked, the vice president of what company? For me it was an off night at the theater. I don't want my money back. Are you listening Scott Rudin? I'd like a ticket to see it again. Maybe those 25 others would too.
If you go by several adamant playwrights, it's a terrible idea for married couples to get together over an after-hours drink or dinner or for a casual weekend or a serious discussion about children. Nothing good ever comes of it.
I love the fall theater season. First, fall is my favorite time of the year in the city. Second, the fall theater season is chock full of new offerings, but the pressure to see them right away is less than it is with spring offerings, as the Tony Awards isn't as imminent.
Along with Glenn Close, Meryl Streep hosted a premiere screening this week of Israel Horovitz' My Old Lady at MoMA. Her family in tow, husband Don Gummer and daughter Mamie, she was celebrating her pal Kevin Kline's lead performance in this charming romance set in Paris, as well as Horovitz' debut as filmmaker.
Close and Irons went on to star in House of the Spirits and Reversal of Fortune together, but his favorite Close role was
Macbeth is surely one of the worst hosts ever dreamed up by a playwright, but he has plenty of company in literature as a whole.
When you look over the plays Noel Coward trumpeted during his fabulous career, few give the impression of being in any direct way autobiographical.
Let me tell you that if anyone wanted a spot-on one-sentence review of Eno's newest work, you couldn't do any better than what she said. But we professional assessors are expected to say more. So I will, although I'd love to let it go at the friendly woman's comment.
Mr. McNally knows how to write funny, and has provided us with much laughter over the years. But not here.