Edwidge Danticat

It’s a gray overcast morning in San Francisco. I sit at Gate 86 of SFO airport waiting to board UA Flight 358 to Las Vegas
One of the strongest impressions my 18,000-mile, 3 1/2-month road trip left me with was that not only are we Americans not all on the same page (to put it mildly), and not only do we not even want to be on the same page, but we live in different worlds.
Whether Claire of the Sea Light is a novel or a book of stories is a literary question, one students and scholars are welcome to debate for years to come, now that Danticat has given the book to us.
I knew I wanted to interview a diverse and celebrated group of African Americans writers because they have been so important to the vitality of American literature.
Several themes have been dancing around inside my head lately. Tiptoeing like a ballerina is the power of art to transform us.
Last week, I had the honor of traveling to Port-au-Prince and reading to a group of these children "Eight Days," a picture book I wrote about the earthquake in Haiti.
Danticat has written a children's book about a 7-year-old boy named Junior who gets buried in the rubble of his Haitian home
Even before the earthquake, a shocking 70% of Haitian women and girls surveyed claimed to have experienced physical, sexual, political or psychological violence.
I encourage Haitians to claim their identity as the posterity of the first black republic, not as descendants of the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. It is not political strength, hurricanes, or earthquakes that define us.
As we all shudder through news of the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti, we've also been hearing from the literary voices, that for many of us, first brought Haiti alive.
Massacre River, by René Philoctète, translated from the French by Linda Coverdale, with a preface by Edwidge Danticat and
Richard Powers lounges in bed all day and speaks his novels aloud to a laptop computer with voice-recognition software. Junot
"When [my first novel] was just published, people walked up to me and told me that someone who worked at their house is Haitian," Danticat said. "Now there are a number of people telling me that their doctor is Haitian."
Last night I had the pleasure of attending Edwidge Danticat's presentation at the second annual Toni Morrison Lecture at Princeton University.