edx

It's clear that with innovative online education programs like these, more people globally are exposed to high-quality, career
Before you guys get crazy at Electric Zoo this weekend, take a hot second to check out a Huffington Post exclusive. EDX just
MIT professor Anant Agarwal explains how his nonprofit online university, edX, uses technology to educate refugees for free.
MIT professor Anant Agarwal explains how his non-profit online university edX is using technology to provide refugees education for free
Anant Agarwal, MIT Professor and CEO of edX, explains why he believes using new technology is the key to providing affordable higher education for everyone.
Morgan Richards, a 31-year-old mother of three, is a trendsetter in her pursuit of a university degree.
Coding, otherwise known as programming, was at some point something that only the nerdiest of nerds knew about, the same nerds that established a solid foundation for what we call the Web today.
With the help of edX, a platform for Massive Open Online Classes, or MOOCs, we were able to teach thousands of students from around the globe how to produce solution-based journalism that drives social change.
In other places, like Scotland, we had 80 local hubs that kept connected via various national gatherings, with the Deputy
I don't think that brick-and-mortar universities will be obsolete soon, but can definitely become better with new initiatives like BreadX. Technology is never a substitute, but a complement to make things better.
The exorbitant cost of higher education is a recurrent topic of conversation, concern, and discontent these days. Against that backdrop, an announcement from edX and Arizona State University caught my attention last week.
There has been lots of talk the past few years about the coming "disruption" in higher education. Technology, critics suggest, will present traditional colleges and universities with daunting challenges. Some have estimated that half will be forced to close their doors in the next 15 years.
New York Times declared 2012 as the year of the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). It was the year when Udacity, Coursera and edX, the three leading MOOC companies, took the education world by storm and promised a lot.
Stepping back, what are we learning? We see that the emerging 21st-century model of higher education is an inversion of the 20th-century model in that it places the learner in the driver's seat of personal, relational, and institutional renewal.
If higher education (like dentistry) are craft services where the efficiencies we've seen in factory production over the last century are not easily applied, what can explain the rapid rise in costs of these boutique industries since the 1980s?
Given the nature of averages, if some people are paying full retail then a lower average can only mean that others are paying much less. And the difference between sticker price and what people actually pay is referred to as "tuition discounting."
If you read enough books and articles, or watch enough news segments about why colleges cost so freaking much (and supposedly deliver little for the price), a consensus emerges that tends to include the following premises.
We live on a razor's edge. From one instant to another, any of us can regress to yesterday's mindset or connect with an emerging future possibility.
As I began to look into this question a bit more deeply, the answers and arguments I discovered seemed as uninformed or contradictory as those surrounding massive open learning.