effeminate gay men

This sort of inaction by lawmakers makes it increasingly unsafe and difficult for our transgender denizens.
Both homophobia and sexism are part of the structure of the patriarchy. They are the most enduring building blocks in the construction of prejudice. And when those ideas come from within the gay community, we have a paradoxical situation.
Actor Sean Hemeon joins HuffPost Live to discuss starting in the show "Husbands."
Even after I accepted my sexuality, I struggled with my femininity. I spent hours in the gym, building my body in an effort to emulate the ideal of what men supposedly should look like. I even shaved my head. But the nasal voice and extra bounce in my step were inescapable.
The gay community is not immune to the idea that femininity is second-class. We still trot out our brawniest and brusquest as our spokesmen. It astounds me that gay culture continues to perpetuate the values that have kept women and gay men oppressed.
Husbands embraces clichés, stereotypes and tropes to make a point: Most old ideas are only as meaningless or as negative as their context. Few of these notions are intrinsically detrimental, as the judgements we attach to them exist only in our minds.
Femininity is absolutely still seen as something shameful among males. In season 2 of Husbands, we dug even deeper into this idea, building our story around the idea that the "gayer" character is less publicly acceptable.
For a long time, being considered a stereotype really made me mad; I wanted to prove how unstereotypical I am, but recently I've come to realize that what others might consider a stereotype I consider just being myself.
There's an undeniable pansy vortex in gay life. You fall into it with baggy jeans and climb out of it with spandex up the crack of your ass.