egypt coup

What we have today is a West that is retreating militarily and shrinking economically, yet one that still speaks as the lord and master in command of the fates of nations and continents.
A funereal atmosphere descended over western capitals with the announcement of Turkey's parliamentary elections' results, widely described in European and American media as a "shock" and a "black day for Turkey." The picture painted appeared very bleak, as a stream of reports, editorials and op-eds by opposition figures warned of a "return to autocracy and despotism" and declared the outcome as a threat to the "survival of democracy" in the country.
Opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans and wave a national flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on
Blair will reportedly advise the administration on economic policy through a UAE-financed task force run by management consulting
After a recent CODEPINK delegation to Egypt ended up in deportations and assault, we have become acutely aware of some of the horrors that Egyptians are facing in the aftermath of the July 3 coup that toppled Muslim Brotherhood President Mohamed Morsi.
Debates in recent months over the continuation of US aid to the Egyptian military, in light of the deteriorating human rights
One of the principal reasons so many Egyptians cheered the tanks out on to the street was the belief -- sincere or otherwise -- that whatever sort of government arose from the coup would be freer and more democratic than the Muslim Brotherhood it usurped.
Egypt is the heartbeat of the Arab world, and the path it chooses will have a profound influence on all Arabs.
Hatem Azzam, vice president of the moderate Islamist Al-Wasat Party and a member of the now disbanded 2012 parliament, compared
There is no escaping it: Egyptians have fallen for their country again. At the centre of this romance is the shrewd man in uniform and Commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces, General Abdel Fattah el-Sissi.