egypt-facebook

Impact
Instead of sharing cat photos, Egyptians use the social network for new models of society, fundraising and progressive campaigns.
Tech
The same transparent, accessible online organizing tools that enable activists to publicize and share information about protests can be used by authoritarian regimes to track and crack down on those getting involved.
Tech
Egyptian father Jamal Ibrahim has reportedly named his newborn daughter "Facebook" to honor the social media site's role
The World Post
In response to Mubarak stepping down, President Obama delivered a pitch perfect speech calling for "nothing less than genuine democracy," not just a government aligned with U.S. interests. There will be many foreign policy takeaways from Egypt, but here's an obvious one: invading a country, toppling its regime, destroying civil society, and then trying to put all the pieces back together with a ten-year occupation and a few trillion dollars turns out not to be the only way to increase the spread of democracy in the Middle East. Wired was more effective than warred. People can now connect to each other faster than any government can connect with its people. And while governments may be able to shut down the hardware, they can't shut off the social effects of digital networks. Any leader who doesn't understand this dynamic should book a room next to wherever Mubarak is heading.
Denver
From my distant life in America, I have observed the Jasmine Revolution, the uprising in Cairo and Alexandria through friends' eyes via the bits of email and Facebook posts they can share.
Tech
Since his release, Ghonim has become a symbol for the Egyptian movement, although he has rejected this notion. "I'm not a
Tech
The Egyptian "kill switch" was simultaneously a technical success and a mystifying strategic blunder. Could other governments implement such a kill switch?
Tech
A key driving force in this new equilibrium is the role of the media -- and, more specifically, the rise of the "me" in media
The World Post
With chaos still roiling Egypt, it's hard to tell if this uprising is Iran 1979, China 1989, or East Germany 1989. We'll have to wait and watch before we can know. But it's not too early to know that if America had done more to nurture a moderate opposition for the last 30 years, instead of choosing a strongman who sided with us over uncertain democracy, we might have some better choices right now. More importantly, so would the Egyptian people. Social media is once again playing an integral role in a popular uprising. Mubarak and his saber-wielding thugs have desperately tried to shut down the Internet and the press in a frantic attempt to keep the whole world from watching. But that's so much harder to do in the age of Twitter, Facebook, cell phone cameras, and YouTube uploads. These new media tools will play a key role in determining whether Tahrir Square 2011 is more Berlin Wall or more Tiananmen Square.
Tech
At the time of this tweet, Engel was in Cairo's Tahrir Square, where a massive crowd has gathered to demand that President
The World Post
Assad is talking reform. But how seriously can we take him?
Tech
A graphic from Renesys says it all, but the net tracking firm also spelled it out: "Egyptian Internet providers returned to the Internet at 09:29:31 UTC (11:29am Cairo time)."
Tech
All major Egyptian ISPs appear to have readvertised routes to their domestic customer networks in the global routing table. We can also confirm that Facebook and Twitter are up and available.
Tech
How helpful is social media? I don't think we know the answer to that yet, but it's worth noting that repressive regimes are pretty anxious to shut off access to it when movements get rolling.
The World Post
Find out what your friends are saying on Facebook about the historic protests taking place in Egypt. You just have to Facebook
The World Post
Violent demonstrations rocked Egypt for the fourth consecutive day, with scores of protesters demanding the resignation of
The World Post
On the same day that Egypt has suspended online activity, Syria has also blocked internet service, according to reports. UPDATE
The World Post
Have a tip you want to share? You can leave a message for HuffPost at 00-1-315-636-0962. If you know someone there and have
The World Post
The Muslim Brotherhood has not been behind three days of protests by youth angry at poor living standards and authoritarian
The World Post
At Ramsis square in the heart of the city, thousands clashed with police as they left the al-Nur mosque after prayers. Police