egyptians

In the past three years, it has become common for Egyptians to hear stories of those who left Egypt -- a friend, a friend of a friend, a cousin, a neighbor, an acquaintance, a well-known activist, a public figure -- all packed their things and dreams they cherished for Egypt in the wake of the revolution, and off then went. To Canada, to the US, to Australia, to Europe, to the Arab Gulf, to Turkey -- and elsewhere.
In the sixth part of his Chronicle of a caged journalist series, Egyptian war correspondent Yehia Ghanem asks how the US and the mujahideen, both, walked into cages constructed of ignorance so that they came to view each other as enemies.
Spike Lee, we can't be mad at you, For using your creativity is what you do. My ire is directed more towards those, Who are angry that Chi-Raq is in couplets not prose
Farouk, Sadat and El Sisi wore military uniforms on their respective sails. In another tweet, before the change to civilian
Our polling shows that Arab opinion is largely confounded when it comes to assessing the region's current crises. They know where they want to be, but they don't know how to get there.
As the men wait for news of those left behind and grieve over their friends and family killed by extremists, they now face
For too long, we in the Arab world have been cursed by having to choose between either secular authoritarianism (mostly led by military rulers) or a religious authoritarianism, disguised as a democracy-loving party or entity.
Ultimately, we do play a part in our own destiny, for destiny only takes us half way. The rest we have to walk ourselves.
Anyone rooting for Egyptians and the progress of their revolution was up against a nerve-racking week of news and analysis surrounding the one-year anniversary of the first coordinated protests at Tahrir Square.