Elaine Stritch

"I'm the kind of girl who's tried everything once," Valerine Perrine purrs in Lenny. As Mrs. Bruce in the Bob Fosse film, her claim, let's say, contained slightly off-color elements.
"Yeah, Ian, what do you want?" she asked, as direct as ever. Velma stumbled - it had been years since they'd seen each other
'In the case of Phoenix House, many HBO films do focus on addiction. We have all seen many young people succumb to peer pressure to try substances to escape reality. The need for escape seems great right now. '
As you read through the liner notes for Walt Disney Record's Legacy Collection version of The Little Mermaid soundtrack, there's an anecdote in there that's sure to blow pop culture fans' minds.
Say whatever else you want to about 2014, here's one thing I know for sure. It had 365 days. And since new movies opened on screens across the USA on a great many of those days, I feel compelled to consider the year in films.
Hunter Ryan Herdlicka, who co-starred with Stritch in A Little Night Music and is a member of the Honorary Producing Committee
Carlo Bergonzi was one of the "other" tenors when I was a teenager going to the Metropolitan Opera. Like Nicolai Gedda, Bergonzi was a tenor's tenor. He did not send off fireworks like a Tucker or a Corelli. He did not summon the deep wells of sadness that Vickers could. He was simply perfect.
It always surprises me to think about just how much she contributed to an era of filmmaking -- gracing screens large and small from the 1930s to the 1980s.
The still handsome, still-fit Chakiris, who now designs jewelry, enjoys reminiscing. But two weeks after Stritch's death in Michigan at 89, he wants to set the record straight.
Within the past month we have read with sadness of the deaths of four important artists who seemingly have little in common: composer and author Mary Rodgers Guettel, internationally famous American conductor Lorin Maazel, Broadway and cabaret star Elaine Stritch, and the legendary operatic tenor Carlo Bergonzi. They do actually have one thing in common: me.
To every comedian who has ever given us hours of fun and laughter, I say a sincere thank you. You have given us a great gift, one that may add years to our lives.
What impressed me most about Elaine Stritch, my friend, was how she handled the sad moments in her life. Now, I have to handle a sad moment alone -- Elaine is gone.
"SUSHI had become the pizza of the upper­middle class, the policeman Simon Kefas as he attempts to eat a tiny jellyfish in Norway's best­selling latest thriller titled The Son.
"HAS there ever been a summer of 23 sequels before?" asks The Hollywood Reporter's Todd McCarthy. (We here, writing for the older masses, are ever grateful to the lush- looking Reporter for keeping us so ably up to date.)
My friend Sean messaged me. "You know, she lives in the Carlyle Hotel, and once I called the Carlyle and asked to speak with Elaine Stritch, and they connected me. So what you need to do is call her, tell her how fabulous you are, and she'll give you tickets!" I declined, and for a good reason: I had actually met Elaine.
When I met Elaine Stritch, she was sober, and I was drunk. It was 1998 at a book party for Joan Collins at the bygone social X-ray hangout Mortimer's. At 30, I thought I was jaded when it came to bending elbows with the rich and famous. Until I saw Her.
When my interview with Elaine Stritch aired on "So What Else Is News?" -- my Air America Radio show back in the day -- someone wrote me saying I laughed way too hard in it. I wrote back that it was because I was terrified of her.
Non-theatergoers will know her from her comic turn as Alec Baldwin's imperious mother in 30 Rock. I remember her from a sweeter moment, after a performance of her Tony-winning one-woman show, Elaine Stritch At Liberty.
I met her in November 1988. She was guest-starring on an episode of a short-lived NBC television series called Tattinger's. A one-shot playing star Stephen Collins' mother Franny, a seen-it-all former Broadway chorus girl. Cinch casting. And among the first of the many guest-starring tough mama roles that became her bread and butter in the decades ahead.