election laws

Election laws should be above politics. Whether to enact an election regulation should be about only one thing: will the law improve the democratic process for all voters? Yet the history of voter ID laws, among most significant and partisan issues infecting our elections, has always involved politics.
Try to cast a regular ballot, rather than a provisional one, when voting this fall.
There is, of course, nothing in the Constitution that forbids the creation of political parties, and in fact the First Amendment rights of association gives parties the right to make their own rules for how it selects a nominee.
Evenwel represents a valuable opportunity for the Court to not only clarify its case law concerning reapportionment but also affirm a vital principle central to our law: the Constitution protects citizens against arbitrary action by government in every field.
The Arizona Legislature argues this citizen legislation represents a violent break with the Framers' constitutional vision. But, in fact, it is Clement and the Arizona Legislature who offer the radical interpretation.
If they are to be true to the better angels of our nature, courts need to strike down racial quotas when the obvious and intended effect of them to disrupt multiracial political coalitions.
One thing is for certain: the O'Keefes combined -- one a New Yorker and the other a Michigander -- have introduced a poisonous new element to Wisconsin politics.
Candidates and party committees are banned from privately coordinating the content of their messages and the conduct of their
All along, Wisconsin has been fighting to make the exercise of the right to vote a bureaucratic hell when alternative identification processes have proven viable in other states with little to no downside for our most fundamental right, electoral integrity, and the state's scarce financial resources.
As long as the state is not required to justify its ID laws with facts and introduce evidence that its last-minute procedural changes actually cure constitutional and Voting Rights Act violations, they will always win. Always.