Electric utilities

London’s new “smart street” is using new technology to encourage sustainable shopping and draw customers in.
Investors are asking for clear signals which will help them to place a monetary value against the risks they may face in
From across the nation an army of men, and a few women, is on the move. They are deployed with tools and gauges, maps and their own know-how in a critical battle. They are shock troops fighting the flooding in North and South Carolina.
Dear candidates - spare our technology, please, and do not get policy from the old tapes or old demagogues. The world is changing a lot faster than the talking points.
Howard Hughes, a pioneer in movie making and aviation (which informed his cantilevered underwire bra design for actress Jane
The Clean Power Plan is a breath of fresh air from the federal government too often known for climate inaction, but it shouldn't reinforce an increasingly unnatural electric company monopoly over the electric system.
These postcards from Florida (inspired by a campaign by Vote Solar) shine a little light on what Hawaiians can expect from
In his Sunday Wall Street Journal commentary on May 17, Brian Potts suggests that cost is the bottom line in the electric customer shift to solar, and that solar costs too much. But his defense of the utility's view of energy costs leaves a big hole in the big picture: the value of solar energy.
The electric utility is at a crossroads. Facing flat electricity demand and a sudden insurgent campaign from rooftop solar, the large, centralized utility company is entering a new era. The smarter utilities are moving with the tide rather than fighting it.
Most adventuresome new car buyers are skipping electric cars for now and buying another gas-powered vehicle to tide them over until the problems of range and public charging are solved. Clearly, the EV charging market requires standards.
Who pays the cost of maintaining the grid while the rooftop entrepreneur uses it at will? Short answer: everyone else.
A 2.0 utility business model that doesn't accommodate this opportunity for local, equitable access to energy production and management will leave many U.S. electricity consumers deeply unsatisfied.
Exelon's brazenly dishonest campaign against wind and other renewables has outraged environmentalists and nuclear watchdog groups. But it also has aroused the ire of some of its own industry fraternity members.
The Commission voted to value solar above the retail rate, and to allow solar customers to receive compensation at that rate for the power they produce. It may sound like a sweet deal for solar, but the reality is that VOSTs are a major red flag.
A different approach to quantifying the very real value of going solar would be wise. At the very least, solar companies should jettison the practice of using past rate increases to predict the future, something that is far too common these days.
Stepped-up oversight may not be in the cards, however. Since 2000, the electric utility industry has made $127 million in
Collectively, the power industry sucks in approximately 80 trillion gallons of water annually to cool their equipment. In the process, they kill on a massive scale fish, larvae and other aquatic organisms.