Elementary and Secondary Education Act

Sure, why not? Let’s just kill most innovation in education in the name of school choice.
We have gotten used to hearing bad news about schools -- particularly schools that serve children from low-income families. And yet there is good news out there. Some educators really have figured out how to educate all kids to high levels.
But ten years would have have been a short wait for educators who have been waiting almost 15 years for the latest update
The Partnership for Children and Youth and Every Hour Counts applaud Congress for passing this critical and long-overdue update to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and we believe it accomplishes many important goals.
Education is the most important thing I can provide for my three daughters. But it is not enough for me to know that they are learning; I need to know that they are achieving.
Accountability is not just rhetoric -- nor is it just a slogan. It is a promise to our children and their parents that schools will quickly identify students who need an extra hand and intervene when necessary.
United States Secretary of Education Arne Duncan delivered a speech at the National Press Club on September 30th that should serve as a powerful call for the country to make a massive shift in the allocation of funding for prisons and schools.
It's probably best that our nation's founders are not around to hear the current debate about education policy in the United States. Those who fought and worked so hard to create this new country likely would be badly confused, and probably greatly frustrated, by the language being used today.
Forty years later, it is clear that the original intent of the ESEA has still not been met for too many children, especially children with disabilities.
The current congressional debate for reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the law which determines federal policy for public schools, is certain to create new opportunities for businesses and may even create new roadblocks.
Through the union, educators are raising our collective voice. Together with parents and students, educators are turning the tide. Teaching is our heart. Our students are our soul. And the union is our spine. When educators raise their voice and their power, we can reclaim the promise of public education.
In fall 2016, Jamillah will leave her Head Start classroom to begin kindergarten in a suburb of Washington, DC. Like many of her Head Start classmates, she is a tiny bundle of joy and curiosity; she loves colored pencils and books of all sorts, and adores singing the alphabet song.
It will take years to recover from the damage that Arne Duncan's policies have inflicted on public education. He exceeded the authority of his office to promote a failed agenda, one that had no evidence behind it. The next president and the next Secretary of Education will have an enormous job to do to restore our nation's public education system from the damage done by Race to the Top.
This could be the most momentous week in federal education policy in the thirteen years since No Child Left Behind (NCLB) became law. The fact that the U.S. Senate is scheduled to take up a major rewrite of NCLB is historic in and of it itself.
If we've learned anything from the failure of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), it should be that NCLB's accountability strategy -- pressuring schools to continuously raise standardized test scores -- doesn't work.
Frankly, I was nothing short of stunned by your lack of understanding of the policies and approaches to dyslexia in our public schools.
At the heart of the disagreement is whether the law should include meaningful accountability for the nation's most at-risk students. A group of effective classroom teachers from across the country is joining the fray with a powerful -- and perhaps unexpected -- message.